Branding Matters

Josh & Rachel Lee - Stand Out on LinkedIn

July 09, 2021 Branding Badass Season 1 Episode 32
Branding Matters
Josh & Rachel Lee - Stand Out on LinkedIn
Show Notes Transcript

My guests today are Josh and Rachel Lee, the Founders and co-owners of Standout Authority; a company that helps brands build human connections online.

Known as “the Dopamine Dealer of LinkedIn”, Josh spent the last 20 years building 16 businesses and is the author of the book “Balance is Bullshit”. In 2003 he started in online marketing with clients like MySpace and Google and controlled half a billion dollars in ad spend.

His beautiful wife Rachel (aka the Branding Ladyboss) has run multi-million dollar brand marketing strategies and campaigns for companies like Microsoft and Gartner. Today Rachel leads the marketing and branding strategy for Standout Authority and its clients. And her special sauce is helping brands find their unique voice and create influence in the digital space.

I invited this “dynamic duo” to be guests on my show to discuss why building human connections, is one of the most important things anyone can do in their business. I wanted to learn why B2B and B2C are taking a back seat H2H. And I was curious to learn what brands are doing differently since the pandemic to help them stand out on LinkedIn.

Joelly Goodson :

Hi, I'm Joelly, your Branding Badass, and welcome to my new podcast. Branding Matters. Today I have two guests. They're the husband and wife team Josh and Rachel Lee. They're also the founders and co owners of standout authority, a company that helps brands build human connections online. Known as a dopamine dealer of LinkedIn. Josh spent the last 20 years building 16 businesses and as the author of the book balances bullshit. In 2003, Josh started an online marketing with clients like my space and Google, and he end up controlling half a billion dollars in ad spend. his beautiful wife Rachel, also known as the branding lady boss has run million multi million dollar brand marketing strategies and campaigns for companies like Microsoft and Gartner. Today Rachel leads the marketing and branding strategy for standard authority and its clients. And her special sauce is helping brands find their unique voice and create influence in the digital space. I invited this dynamic duo to be guest on my show today to discuss why building human connections is one of the most important things anyone can do in their business. I wanted to learn why b2b and b2c are taking a backseat these days to h two H. And I was curious to learn what brands are doing differently since the pandemic to stand out on LinkedIn. Rachel, Josh, welcome to branding matters.

Josh:

Thank you so much.

Rachel:

Thank you so much. We're so excited to be here.

Joelly Goodson :

Well, I'm really excited to have you. And I'm glad that you're both here when Josh first reached out to me about doing this. And then I learned like I mentioned a little bit more about you, too. I was like, I kind of have Rachel on Are you kidding me? They're quiet if you guys are a great team. So thanks for being here today. So let's talk about Standout Authority. Can you tell us a little bit Josh, why don't you start tell us a little bit about what the company is and why you got started?

Josh:

Yeah, no worries, I mean, Standout Authority. We work with entrepreneurs and influencers to really be able to help them stand out and humanize their brand online to the vehicle of LinkedIn, right? I mean, we're going through and doing engagement and influencer marketing, to really be able to drive real relationships and connection, right not just leads to be able to build community and relationships that turn into opportunity for our clients. And the reason why this kind of came to fruition is just my background. You know, 20 years ago, I started my first company in the online advertising space. And look, I monetized everything, I was known as the King of monetization. And you know, if you need to be able to monetize your site, your traffic, like I was able to figure it out. But throughout all that time in history, Julie I, I don't think I sold a whole bunch of things. But I'm not sure how many people I helped. And so when I had the opportunity seven years ago to really go through a reset, and really figure out how to actually change the trajectory, the perspective of what we're doing as marketers, and the brand around what marketing really means. That's kind of where that opportunity kind of came in. Honestly, I didn't see it at first. And we were doing a couple of different things on LinkedIn, but you know, bring in this amazing soul partner of mine next to me, and, you know, showing Rachel what I was doing, what was going on understanding some of the stuff that she was doing at Microsoft to around you know, what social selling was and things like that. And I started pairing what I was doing prior like I went through a divorce prior to Rachel and I being able to get married, and I kind of reset and at first I was like I'm gonna teach everyone I wrote a book balance is bullshit, right? Like how to be you know, I wanted I was gonna be a life coach people to make sure that there was no one ever found in that same situation. But I realized that one life coach was not my my overriding goal. But I wanted to take what I wanted to help people in that life about connecting with other human beings, and then pair it with my knowledge of marketing. And that's kind of where we we find ourselves today. really helping people be able to understand their voice and how to be able to share it in an impactful way. That drives massive opportunity and connection. How do I do babe? Did I did I explain that? Well, thank you. I always like to make

Rachel:

You didn't mention the brand piece of it b sure

Josh:

Because you're the Branding Lady Boss

Rachel:

Because this is the Branding Matters podcast and the world we live in today that is mobile, social media, digital first, our personal brands are more important than ever. The personal brand is really what's building the business brand. The personal brand is what's making the connections. Most of the time people do not know who they are, what they stand for, and then how to communicate that when they're on social media. Yeah, when they're on a podcast, whatever the case may be. And so you know, with standout authority, that company is evolving to not just be, you know, a vehicle, LinkedIn being a vehicle to express your word. It's around understanding who you are, what your brand is, how do we work, our brands, w e, rk work our brands to really create influence and impact in the world. And so I think the branding piece of it is literally at the base of the triangle, right? If we don't have that we have nothing we can't create on LinkedIn, and really stand out.

Joelly Goodson :

That's great. So when you meet with clients, before you get into, you know, the connection part is your first mandate, or the first thing is to sit down with them and help them figure out what their brand is? Because like you said, a lot of people have no idea what their brand is, right? They'll just say, I want to start a business. And I'm going to go and I'm going to post all over social media, and they don't know what they're doing. So do you sort of say, okay, before you go there, let's talk about your why and who you are, and how you want to be represented on all these different platforms?

Rachel:

Yeah, 100%. And, in fact, we've learned that when we don't do that, and stand for that with our clients and new partners, it actually is not creating the best results. for them. This has been a great learning process for Josh and I, when people say I just want I really want to grow my influence. I really want to get new leads. I want to get a client for $10,000. on LinkedIn, can you help me in some of these are influencers? Right? No. And why? What do you do? How are you communicating it? Why do you want that $10,000 booking? Do you have an email system set up? Do you have a funnel setup? No, I don't have any. I don't know any of it. Okay, well, then we got a lot of work to do. W e. r k, yeah. Why do you keep saying Wi Fi club on work on my clubhouse? Yeah, that now has over 2000 people part of it. And I do have a session called build your brand and work this shit out of it has sort of become a thing. And it's called your work your brand club. And we just rebranded our branding service as work your brand. And when you are an elite client, you also have the work your brand. And I and I think it's just so important, because it's not just about having a brand and knowing it. It's about what you do with it. And so we have to actually break that whole process in people's minds because nobody knows their brands.

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, most don't know it. You know what, Rachel? I mean, honestly, that's why I started this podcast, because I wanted to help people because I was finding I was talking to clients and talking to people. And same thing, right? I mean, unfortunately, when COVID hit so many people were laid off, and they were forced into entrepreneurship, they wanted to sort of run before they walk, they wanted to just get out there and sell a service or sell a product and not take the time, like you said to figure it all out. And having you here is great, because this is a universal I think issue and I don't think most people get it. And I like the werk the brand. Do you have a theme song? Can you sing it? Yeah, I need like a theme song for werk? Right? I would love it. For now. We've been using Missy Elliott.

Josh:

I played it for a second. I don't know if you could hear it.

Joelly Goodson :

That's okay. You know, can we get in trouble though for licensing?

Josh:

I only played it for half a second. And I want to make sure I respect your product. You don't have a license for it.

Joelly Goodson :

Well, I love that. And I love the W e. Rk. That's great. Good for you. And I like your little plug for clubhouse go girl. Right, that's awesome. I'm going to read a couple of LinkedIn stats here, actually, before I continue. So and you probably know these anyway, so I'm preaching to the choir. But for anyone out there listening who doesn't. LinkedIn has 8 billion has generated 8 billion in revenue in 2020, with an increase of 19% from the year before, 8 billion. And it has 756 million members. And in the United States, it has the United States has most LinkedIn members, followed by India and China. I was also surprised by that. But then I thought about a bit more. And I was surprised that Canada wasn't on there. But it must be a little bit further down. And over 57 million businesses and 120,000 schools have LinkedIn accounts. So people are using LinkedIn basically for two reasons. We're using it to expand their professional skills and make a career move. Right. And that's why it's so popular and then when COVID hit and so many people were laid off and businesses had to you know restructure in the whole world basically turned upside down. Everybody it seems everybody's on there. Now I've been on LinkedIn for a long time and it's changed so much and I you know, I have a premium account because I see the value in it when I first started. I knew so many people that were on LinkedIn and they were just using it. Just put a picture That's it, and never use it as a tool. Right? And it is such an amazing tool. So anyway, back to my original question with all those facts and everything

Josh:

You knocked them out of the park, you're 100% correct on all those facts,

Joelly Goodson :

Did you do a fact check?

Unknown:

I look at them all the time. So you know,

Joelly Goodson :

Thank you, not just another pretty face over here

Rachel:

You know, they're compelling. Most people don't pay attention are paying attention to the magnitude of this platform. And that by using it, you really have excessive access and accessibility, that you've never really can get on some of the other platforms

Joelly Goodson :

for sure. So, you know, you talked about human connection, human to human. And really, I find for myself anyway, and you can let me know what you think it's networking virtually, just like if you're going to network in person, if you're going to go to an event, or you're going to go to a party or wherever any kind of impression network or networking event to make that human connection. It takes more effort. And it takes more time, right, versus just doing a post and everything else. So how do you find that time and build it into your everyday life? Because we're all have jobs? We're all you know, I'm a single mom with two kids. I got a full time career, and then I do my podcast on the side. So how do you make the time to make sure that you connect with when you do a post? And you have people that comment or like it? Do you have some tips for that?

Unknown:

Yeah, yeah. I mean, that makes sense. It does. 100% Look, I mean, there's so so much going on right now. And that platform, that's the biggest thing, right? Like people are like, they want to go in and they go, I want to pitch I want to spam 1000 people and get that one sale. They're like, Yay, well, I look at it as if you just pitch your spam 1000 people and get the one sale, really all you do is piss off 999 people. And I know there's a better way to be able to do it. Right. I mean, these are the things this is why LinkedIn is you're seeing certain things like they've just restricted everyone from sending more than 100 connection requests out a week. You are limited to that now, because people were using that that's the biggest thing. Most people don't like LinkedIn, because of all the spam and all the I mean, even when you reach it, when I reached out to you even question what I was why I was reaching out so well, I mean,

Joelly Goodson :

I actually want to talk to you about spam.

Josh:

But yeah, so we want to be able to make time like it's it's about quality over quantity. And being able to do that, you know, I always tell people, there's four things you need to do every single day minimum on LinkedIn to be able to really one get in the algorithm. And then to be able to connect with that audience, you may be able to take time out to do one post a day, that adds value to your audience, you need to be able to make one comment on another person's post that adds value to their content, because their readers will see it and they will as well, you should like another person's post. And then later on the day, you should actually share someone else's posts that adds value. Because it's not always about you, you need to be a curator of content, right? We want to be able to be destination sites, we want people to come to us and look for our profile each and every day, because they know that we're gaining the knowledge in all aspects. And we aligned with that that's where we find commonalities. That's the best way to be able to start first. And then this daily looking at who engaged in your content. And it's just taking time out to be able to respond like if you do this within an hour every day, you should be able to go through and do that and then go through and respond to the people that have sent you messages or engaging your content. Look, I hate cold calling and cold emailing. So you know, I don't want anyone to to do that. Right? Like I asked people all the time, like you want to get a cold call. Well, most people don't either. So how do you build that relationship? It takes a little time, like you were saying,

Joelly Goodson :

Rachel, do you have anything you want to add to that?

Rachel:

You don't have an hour a day, right? So for Josh, it's our business, I get that. Like sometimes you have to step back and really first think about what is your brand? And what are my goals. And we if you understand what your purpose is and what gifts you're trying to give to the world, which I hope is much more than working in a nine to five and feeling like you're a cog in a wheel. I just quit my job so that I can live my purpose and share my voice. And for me my brand. I know that when I spend time on LinkedIn, when I go on Instagram, I am fulfilling my purpose it doesn't feel like I'm wasting that hour what I think is do the best we can and when we know what our goals are, then it feels like you're not doing the work but to work our brands we have to get out there. And so if you can there is no I know every single person that's listening right now is spending at least 10 minutes on social media. The average person what spends I think it's two hours average up where I think the younger generation is like upwards of almost 10 hours actively I have two teenage boys so trust day That is ridiculous because it doesn't feel good so much worse just a post because you feel you have to post what because then it's not feeling right you know, so at the very least, because I am a stepmom and we have so many things to do. And I know that people that are listening, like I don't have much time, at the very least every day, bare bare minimum, if you can't post every day, get on and like, and comment literally should take you four minutes. And you're in the algorithm, because part of what we talk about is you need to get in the algorithm, we are the algorithm. So if we're not in it, don't be surprised when you're not getting what you expect out of it. And so even those little little bits can go some and then if you have time to do that, post, or share post amazing and work your way into it. And you know, let's be real, he's the dopamine dealer of LinkedIn, he calls himself that, because we all know, we get excited when somebody is liking my post, somebody commenting, Josh just liked my post and commented, you're all of a sudden, they're, you're in it, you're posting, you're on the feed, right. And so there's a little bit of that, like human condition that we inherence and really try to use it to your advantage.

Joelly Goodson :

I totally agree with everything both of you just said, but I want to talk about spam. So first of all, I want to know what you consider to be spam.

Josh:

So if someone sends me a message request, or one, if you send me a connection request, blank, a blank connection request without anything around it, you know, look, I'm going to be honest, I need to be able to have a reason why I'm connecting with you. At the same time, if you send me a, you know, a message or question that you pitch me two seconds later, I consider that spam. Like if you have no clue of who I am, like how many times really, I get, hey, Josh will be because my name on LinkedIn is Joshua B. So when people are using those auto generation lead tools that you're not supposed to on LinkedIn, it grabs that further. Hey, Josh, will be I personally look to your profile. Have you ever thought about using LinkedIn to get leads? You didn't look at my profile at all. So that's if you don't take two segments, at least look and look at my profile or something, my content, and you send me a message to connect that's spam to me.

Joelly Goodson :

I agree with you. So I'll tell you what my belief is. And a lot of people think I'm insane. You know, I've been in sales for 30 years, I hate to say, I started when I was 10. No, and I believe in relationships, you know, I'm but I'm also I'm also a very direct, no bullshit person, right? I just, that's who I am. My friends know me, like I cut to the chase. And I know I'm not everybody's cup of tea. But I'm also you know, I also have really strong, long, good relationships. So anyways, so when I reach out to somebody, and it goes both ways. So when someone reaches out to me, and they just send me a request without a message, I will send them a message. And I will say, hey, Rachel, thanks for making the connection. Just curious. What motivated you to reach out to me? Yeah. And then if they don't reply, I don't take them friend requests. And if they reply, and then they say, Oh, well, you know, I'm just building connections, and I feel and they give me some very generic thing, why they connected with me, then I'm like, Okay, and then, you know, we'll be connections, and then ventually, they'll be like, oh, by the way, Julie, I can offer you this discount, like, you know, and I'm just like, Okay, why don't you just tell me that when you connect with me initially and say, Hey, joy, you know, minute like you did, my name is Josh. All right, actually, guy reached out to me this morning. And he was great. I wanted to take his thing, because he literally said, This is my name. This is what I do. This is how I can help you. This is what you know, this is where I see in what you're doing that you can become better. Do you have five minutes to talk with me? And I love it. Because I'm like, he told me why you want to connect me he was very to the point. And I have the option to say either No, I'm not interested, or, and I am interested. So I'm going to connect with him. And I had, I've had a few people reach out to me, especially now with my podcasts that are trying to help me and add value. And I can see that but they get right to the point. So I so when I reach out to somebody, I do the same thing. I say, Hey, my name is Julie, I do this, I see that you're the branding guy at this company. This is what we do. I can help you do this. Do you? Are you interested? And I'll tell you, I got one of my biggest clients last year, totally cold calling, doing just that. And now we've created a relationship that we are now really close, we have a really strong relationship. So we built the relationship after we got the initial y REACHED OUT out of the way. So I know not people don't agree with that. And you might think it's spammy. But I'm sort of like, why can't we just be honest and say, This is what I do this is I know that you do this right at the beginning, right?

Josh:

Sure. You have to do the research. That's the beginning. If everyone goes well, I'm just gonna do that to 1000 people. Yeah, go through. I'm gonna do a search word. Am I okay? branding, you know, head of branding, and they're gonna use Sales Navigator, they're gonna see the list. They're going to grab it and there's going to send the exact same message out to 1000 people. You are being intentional with who you reach out to and your why. So that's different 100% agree with you there. Because if you know exactly who you're talking to, you're asking an offering, based on their knowledge of them, you've already built a relationship, a one sided relationship, but still a relationship, because you now have to be able to bring another person into it to be able to build the other side. And so 100% I mean, that's just kind of my thoughts on it, because I don't think people take the time out like you did, right. They're not being in there, they're looking for being authentic.

Joelly Goodson :

And it's and knowing that you have just like, you guys, I mean, knowing that you, you genuinely can help them. Right. And I've had, like I said, I've had two guys in the last couple of weeks reach out to me and and both of their services, I think are going to be helpful to me, and I would never know they existed if they didn't call me. So I just, you know, I hear I there is a conversation on LinkedIn, actually, this woman posted and I gave my thoughts and I thought, Oh, I'm gonna now create cause problems, because no one's gonna agree with me. And so I'm just when you brought that up, Rachel, you're sitting there kind of, I'm really curious to know what you're thinking about this? No, I, I think that we always have to remember that every person is different. And their experience is different. their goals are different. This is a almost a billion person platform. And so you know, people that reach out to me, sometimes we're students, or their first language is in English. And yeah, India, is the second. And that's because there's millions and millions of people in India, who really look to us, especially in the US as leaders, and you know, me with my academic background, and so I have people that do reach out a lot without a personalized invite, and you have to approach things However, it's gonna be best for you, Julie, that works for you, you kind of are no BS, this is what you want. You want to be clear, other people are not going to have that same way of working with others. They don't feel comfortable. They're scared to reach out to Rachel. They're scared. Yeah, and I don't want to bother you. Right, or they forgot that on there. I'm like they're on their mobile phone. And on mobile, people don't realize like, Don't send the Connect, you have to push the three buttons to personalize the invites, like that happens a lot like at events. Josh, I'll have like, you know, we go speak. And then of all these invites, told everybody in the thing personalize your invite, but I think to myself, most likely they just saw this presentation. They're excited. They're a mobile, I guess what I'm saying is right. There's a sense of we always have to be careful of I'm just very sensitive. I want to be sensitive online, give people the benefit of the doubt, but also, I hate the hi Rachel B. I know that that's why no name or no name, the worst is no name. If I don't even see a name. Like that is one thing. That's a pet peeve. I see. Dear madam, delete.

Josh:

Because then further automation is often it's like Hi, first name, you're like, Yeah, man, y'all don't even take time to make sure what if you're going to do automation?

Joelly Goodson :

I agree. No, and and that's why I asked you what you thought was spam. Because I think that's bad when there's no name

Rachel:

That's spam, but what you're talking about is a little bit more on tact and how you create conversations and build relationships. And that is different per person. And so I guess I will always take like a little bit more of a sensitive, and I work with so many students. And I think like at the end of the day, what we can always do is be honest, be respectful, personalize those invites, if you're reaching out to somebody, and you do have an intent to ask about a job or something like yes, it is good to do that and be clear about it. So and that's just being you know, honest with our intentions behind things. But it's also somebody reaches out and just wants to connect with me with no intentions.

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, absolutely. So we're kind of gone full circle. But I love that you said that. So let's bring it back to what are some common mistakes that you see people and brands doing right now on LinkedIn?

Rachel:

The biggest thing that I believe that most who are talking at you know, when they're creating content, they're always talking about their company, and about what they can do for someone else. No one cares about your shiny shit. They care about the result of what it does for them and what it result is done for others, right? You need to be a storyteller. So don't continually go in there. And every single post is about what you can do and what your company does tell me what you have done what you have accomplished. Rather people tell me a story about what what you do, or why you do it right. Because that's really why people want to be able to work with I was saying, like for a headline on LinkedIn, it's I help X to achieve y so they can do z because x is your ideal client y is what you do the service but z the outcome is the reason why someone buys from wants to work with you right? And they choose to work with you as the outcome and as the emotional experience that someone gets from because we are emotional beings. You know, no matter where you look at it, we make decisions emotionally what he even deepen on that and this goes back to the brand piece, what are the pain points you're solving for? That is what Josh is talking about. outcome. So when we think about our brand, and we think about what's our value proposition? And then how do we bring that messaging to life through our content and through the words that we say, we need to think about what pain point we're solving for people. And so when it comes to brand, like you ask like, what are people really doing wrong or right? The brands that are doing it really well, are actually humanizing their companies. And that's why personal brand is so important. Important. There's only two ways you humanize your brand you do the the people at the company, or the customers. That's it, you either in you should be doing. Both the customers can talk about how you solve their problem, what Josh is talking about, why don't you stop talking about it, go get some customer testimonials, have Joelly talk about what it was like to have Rachel and Josh to her podcast, instead of us saying, hey, come find me. Come come pick me for your podcast. When I want to be on the next podcast, I'll just say, Hey, why don't you listen to my podcast with Joelly, or here's her recommendation for us. Right? And so that you look at Microsoft, you look at LinkedIn, they have some amazing brand work that they've been doing. It's all human faces, because it's all about empowering people. That's why Microsoft and LinkedIn are so beautiful together, because it's all about empowering people, and through technology. And so if you're listening, this is why we're so passionate about the personal brand sign, because if we can get you to shine, the business will shine. And then the customers are gonna come to you, it's not gonna even be they're going to want to talk about you, they're going to be your advocates, it's going to be so easy. Because you have a purpose. you've identified that really clearly, and people are resonating with you so that you're just connecting, you're not selling anything.

Joelly Goodson :

And you know, your employees are your biggest brand. Because you talk about what Brendan said, Josh, when you talked about people posting and hitting on pain points, that is huge. Because you're right, you said this earlier today, like I just care about me and my problems, right? We're all we're all in our own heads. We're all in our own worlds. We're all dealing with different issues. So when someone says to me, what is it that your biggest problem is this, guess what I can help you with that? versus we have skilled this and we are number one in this field. And we have the best in the class this and we're and it's mee, mee mee mee mee right? And caught like, are you we're all over your customer. Like, it should be all about you. Right? It should be all but like, we can make your life easier, we can give you more freedom, we can give you more time with your kids, we can help your stress we can bring down there, you know. And so I think it's You're right, it's getting people to buy into that. And that's connecting on that human level.

Unknown:

It's a business platforms out there talk about my business. Now every business is run by another human being most marketers have this forgotten that. And that's why, you know, it's amazing. Like, that's what we do. That's what you do. And this is what it's so important for us to be able to continue to be able to work together to get this message out. Because we have to remember, we're all human. You're boring that way. We just have to remember to be that online.

Joelly Goodson :

That's what Ganga said. So what are some LinkedIn trends that you see right now? both good and bad?

Josh:

Yeah, well, I mean, look, you know, everything is you know, because of clubhouse, things like that we're seeing a shift to audio, because they feel like vulnerability lengthens, already announced by end of year, they will be offering a LinkedIn audio version, some other clubhouse. So we're going to see that trend kind of come into play. I've been playing around with LinkedIn stories, right? I mean, I told you, I just rip my Achilles tendon this weekend. And it's not something that I would usually share in a post on LinkedIn. But I shared it in a story in the amount of messages right, like I always say, be human, you need to have that human side coming through. But it's not Facebook, it's not these other platforms. Like I don't need you don't need to know everything about me, but you need to be able to connect with me. And so instead of putting out as a post, I shared that in a story, and I got so many messages back and people going oh, my God, Josh, hopefully you're okay. You know, how's Rachel doing with all this? to take care of you? Yeah. And it allows us to be able to connect. And then the last piece of it, we'll see polls have been really amazing if you use them the correct way. The problem is that when I first came up, it was like, oh, there's polls. I remember the firt like a year ago or two when they first came out. My last poll was are you sick of polls? Yes or No, because everyone started to use them. If they're used correctly, news, the right way you can gain so much Garner so much information knowledge, and they're getting massive visibility on LinkedIn. I mean, I did a poll the other day, within the one day at over 40,000 views and almost 1000 votes on that one poll, and

Joelly Goodson :

Why and when would somebody do a poll?

Josh:

So myself, we do a poll once a week to be able to understand the type of content we should our audience is looking at, and why should be creating for the next week. Right. And these are the things right, I said, My poll this weekend was on Saturday, do you post on weekends? Right and I this is a poll Like I said, Why? Like, look, I've always been on the assumption that I've even told people this you should only post Monday through Friday because it is a business platform. We all are human, I'd love to be right. Understand your perspective. It's so much reach because now I'm okay. People who get some people leave. Yes, some people leave no. And then I got almost over two over 200 comments on why they believe this. Now I have information to be able to build my next blog to be able to really write and curate content relevant to the audience on LinkedIn.

Joelly Goodson :

Right. So it's a way of interacting. I agree with that interaction. Yeah, I did a poll. Actually. It's funny, I did a poll. I was just I do pools. Not very often, maybe I should do in the morgue, just but like you said, to help me with my content, right. That's why I do them. And I did a poll and I asked people their opinions about Hey, guys, because if you ever seen any of my videos, I started every video. Hey, guys, I say that to everybody. I said that to you, too. When we started, I say that to my girlfriends. That's just what I say. Well, there's been As you've probably seen lots of controversy over saying, Hey, guys, so I was like, You know what, I don't want to offend someone, so or I want to offend people, but I know you're always gonna offend someone. So I did a poll. And I was surprised. And I had three different options. Like, you know, do you think it's terrible, whatever, anyway, and the majority of the people said, they didn't mind it, and it was no big deal. And I was actually, I was worried that I was because my boyfriend said, he was like, Oh, I don't know, Joey got to be careful. I said, I'm just I want to know people's opinion, right?

Josh:

And then we polarizing to like, if you step back from that, and you're not like, you're not gonna get the responses. So I love that

Joelly Goodson :

it was interesting. And anyway, I was happy with the result that I was nervous that I was gonna get everybody say, no, it's terrible. But anyway, so I was just curious to know when you thought it was good to do polls and what wasn't? Yeah. Okay. So we've covered a lot of ground today. I mean, I really like talking to you guys. I know, I've gone on a few tangents here. But let me ask you, Rachel, what's the best part of working with Josh,

Rachel:

you know, Josh, and I, our goal, and yes, he wrote a book called balances bullshit. I think that now more than like, Today, more than last week, more than ever, Josh. And I really want a life that feels not balanced, but integrated. And that is the reason why I'm leaving my job. first reaction people say is, you're going to work with your husband. And part of that is so that Josh and I can shift in from a business conversation to a podcast to helping the kids you know, to do just to feel that our lives can be intertwined, truly intertwined in our mind, our body, our hearts, and it takes work for us to do that. But when I made this decision, I said to myself, well, I know I want to be a business owner, or do this at some point in my life and entrepreneurs always, but I wanted, why would I go out and do that by myself, without my partner who can support me, we can support each other. And I think that together, we're just really way more powerful. We're like, our opportunities together as the bellies are really just, it's amazing how people are responding. And so being with with Josh is actually one of the most like beautiful opportunities of a lifetime that I can share my career, which is super near and dear for me, you know, with him, and we can build something and really, hopefully change the world. We really are trying to do that together.

Joelly Goodson :

That's awesome. And Josh, what's the best part of working with Rachel here? Do you need a Kleenex?

Josh:

You know, there are certain things that I've had to learn how to be able to do especially, you know, after this weekend in understanding, as I told you, I think before we started this growing up, especially United States and everywhere, really, you know, as men, we're taught to be able to not show weakness, not that we have to be able to take it on, then you go on to be an entrepreneur, like you've got to take the world, you're alone, you've got to be able to do all this. And you can't show you know weakness, because how can you help others if you're weak yourself. And these are the things because I've had so many people come to me over the years, and I've had to, I felt I had to be that wrong. And to know that the only way that I can truly change this world and to release that limiting belief that I had, was to be able to depend on my wife to really get us to the next level. And that's what it is Julie to be able to release things that hold us back. I mean, to be able to work with her, and to be able to go and breathe. I mean, that's what it is. Having her as a business partner has allowed me to breathe and be able to take some of this world not only as a husband and father as a business owner off my chest and know that I'm sharing that responsibility of making this world a better place for my kids with her. Yeah,

Joelly Goodson :

That's so nice. Okay, I'm gonna I'm gonna be a little shit disturber because that's what I like to do. So what's the most challenging part of working with your husband?

Unknown:

I will have an MBA. Corporate background I like to get stuff done. I like order in a meeting I like to like I'm control

Joelly Goodson :

"A" type personality. T

Rachel:

Thank you. Yeah, I'm saying and Josh is literally ADD. He's like, you know, he'sjust like total entrepreneur, more visionary. And I'm like sitting here, my teeth, you know, get to the point or we got to get to know.

Joelly Goodson :

So you rein him in?

Rachel:

Yes, I read him in and then he also will open me up, right and sort of be more expansive and say, Hey, we got to go with the flow. We got to pull back. This is running a business. So I think we kind of compliment each other. What bugs you about me?

Joelly Goodson :

I was gonna ask him that. First. What's your sign Rachel?

Unknown:

Um, my son sign is Sagittarius. I'm an Aries rising and I'm a Scorpio moon. He's.

Joelly Goodson :

When's your birthday? Oh, we're

Rachel:

not getting into an astrology conversation. No,

Joelly Goodson :

I'm just curious to know

Unknown:

16th and high is Scorpio.

Joelly Goodson :

Your November 16?

Rachel:

No, I'm December 16. He's November 3.

Joelly Goodson :

November. I'm a Scorpio.

Rachel:

You are November 17. Yeah. So okay, so I got a so you're a Scorpio and you're a Sagittarius is okay. That's cool. Okay, so Josh, what is the most challenging part of working with Rachel?

Josh:

I mean, AC reverse that, right? I mean, it's the same. I kind of go with my gut on things going through being able to understand and you know, she comes from that corporate background where everything has to be like, thought out so methodically 1000 times. And I'm just like, why are we still like, let's just do it and see what happens. I want to fail, fail fast, right? And then be able to get back up and keep on moving forward. And a lot of times, you know, Rachel's like, Well, why let's not fail, and I'm like, screw it. Who cares? Like it's just a failure, I get back up again. So you really, that's kind of where we go back and forth. But that's where we complement each other so well, because yeah, we both have those. It's two sides of a coin, very similar, like my paintings here, which is I have the male and the female ethos based on what I believe them to represent. And I usually without Rachel, here, I'm sitting in between,

Joelly Goodson :

I'm very much the same way with my partner too. And, you know, you butt heads, because you're very, a lot of ways, but I think it's like Yin and Yang. Yeah. Well, thank you for sharing that with me. Like I said, I like to have a little fun. And you know, so people want to learn more about you and about standard authority, what's the best way for them to connect with you? You're obviously all over social media. So what's the best way

Rachel:

we're both the we put that in front of our handles. So the Rachel B Li and Joshua B. Lee on cross

Josh:

b stand for everyone else. So my my middle name is Byron, and you know, so that's just what it was. And when we got married

Rachel:

when he in, you know, Joshua Lee is a very common name Josh Lee is a super common so ocasio and it's actually a good tactic if you're listening, and you have a pretty common name, which guess what Rachel Lee, which is now not now my my married name is also very common, but it was way incidence my maiden name is Rachel Bronstein. And to take his name, I move that to the my middle name. And everyone thought it was brand new one thought it was like a break. No, that is really by my married name. And so now I'm Rachel v. Lee. And we're just both kind of

Josh:

you call us as you heard her mentioned, very Bailey's. Yeah.

Rachel:

Like a thing people think it's they want to be part of the elite crew, you are all part of the B league.

Joelly Goodson :

JOHN Lee, there you go. See only Well, my name is B two. So I'm actually amazed. My email is actually JB good. But anyway, that's another thing. So you're on. So talk, let's talk about how people can connect with you.

Rachel:

Yeah, so any LinkedIn Instagram anywhere off? Obviously, you can also go to stand out authority.com. We have an incredible masterclass that we launched on demand less than three hours, you can learn all the foundational pieces of LinkedIn. So you can find that at standout. Calm, we have a private LinkedIn community. So really, honestly, just like, Come reach out to us, we'll get your message we'd love to connect.

Josh:

And one thing I was saying every single podcast and I love this because I get to be able to share it with the podcast host. If someone's connect with me, send me that LinkedIn message and that personalize it and tell me why. And what you love about Julie. Oh, this is why I listen because she just brings the heat whatever. I get those because then I can come back to you and I can deepen our relationship and you'll hear some messages that I got to people that reached out to me to connect with me and what they said they loved about you. So

Joelly Goodson :

thank you for saying that. Well, let's see what happens if you get any messages if it's crickets let me know. Okay. And just before we go I because I wanted to touch on this too because Rachel you mentioned club hopes and I'm you know, it's funny. I'm on there, but I'm not 100% better yet and you're doing great on both you're doing really well on club posts, you're working it w e r k, i n g, your club post experience and what you do on there? Well, as far as like for people to come and follow you and listen,

Rachel:

yeah, and at the same handles on clubhouse to keep it really easy, you know, clubhouse has really been an amazing opportunity to share our voice instantly. And listen and get questions and the most authentic way possible, it has allowed me to be my most authentic self. And

Josh:

I've seen change in her from being on clubhouse. I mean, this is why we're she left corporate and came because because of clubhouse and being able to share her voice, it has been amazing to be able to watch her stand up and stand out on that platform,

Rachel:

I think and in particular for many women, but not just women, you know, we're very scary to get on a video call, or you're just scared to raise your hand, right. But when you're just on audio, and you're in your bathroom, or whatever the case is, it feels a lot safer, and a lot of a less less of a lift. And so I think that's what the big opportunity for everybody is to meet people you would never meet, there's no such thing as six degrees of separation. We're connecting with amazing top credible people through it. But more than that, more than anything, we're really sharing authentically and frequently, which feels like a really big release. Like sometimes you just need to save like some thoughts. And it's almost therapeutic in some way. And then we're getting big returns on it. You know, in terms of business, I'm following, you know, the TV show starting where we pit Josh pitched it on in a room in a room that was open for a new network. So there's just a massive opportunity. We hope that for everyone really well, we hope you'll be in some of our rooms and be on our stages. If you're listening. We would love that

Joelly Goodson :

if someone wanted to go on clubhouse, let's say they've been like me, and toying with the idea. And I mean, I'm on there. But I'm I'm right now just said voyer. What would advice advice would you give,

Josh:

raise your hand ask to be able to get on stage because no matter what, if you ask a question or add value, you're adding value, because you're going to give a different perspective. And you have to be able to raise your hand to be able to to be able to leverage for people to be able to hear your voice, your perspective, no matter where you come from, what you've done in life, that is where it starts, you've got to be able to raise your hand and be able to allow your voice to be heard. So that's where I say first, once you start doing that, and feeling confident, meaning we're sharing other people's stage, you got to be able to start your own rooms. And even if it's one person with you in there to eolis you're doing a tango, right? It's like, you know, that's one person, you could affect that day. And that's all you got to start with. Okay,

Rachel:

that's interesting. Also, in addition to everything he said, tactically, you know, make sure that you have your bio filled out, look at examples like ours, those first two lines are the most important. That's what people are going to see initially connect your Instagram at the very least that's where the conversations continue. There's no direct messaging in the clubhouse. So connect your Instagram, Don't raise your hand, honestly, without a

Joelly Goodson :

bio. So everything just said, don't do it.

Rachel:

hard, it's very hard as the moderators and the club room leads to help. If we can't go to your Instagram, we don't know who you are. So just get the best experience. put something in that bio, you can, it's always evolving, I'm literally changing mine, like on a weekly basis, connect your Instagram and go into your interests and make sure that what you put in there real interest because that's how your hallway you're gonna follow people gets filled up. So if you are following the networking club or whatever, you're going to see the rooms and clubs that are associated with that. So those are the ways you start getting going and then start following people. Yeah, like if you enjoyed this conversation, follow Joe leave follow Josh, you follow? You just serve.

Joelly Goodson :

I'm not saying anything on there yet. So I'll let you know. Because they'll be able to see the room and go into exactly the only way the only way we're not really active on there though, like I

Josh:

love house are based on who you follow. So it's a different perspective than any other platform out there. You want to follow the right people, because you get access to more like I see rooms from cultures and worlds apart, right? I get to listen in like I would never expect to be part of this conversation. So it has been amazing to be able to listen to be able to participate to be able to grow just based on these amazing people from around the world that are just here there to be able to share value.

Joelly Goodson :

So if I raise my hand, well, you

Josh:

know, 100% so most Wednesdays most Sundays we run rooms we actually do, but Okay, yeah, no, we would love because Rachel has every every other Sunday because we always try and do it with the kids. So when we find out the kids, but our schedules all messed up, we're doing you know, it's work, you know, build your brand and work this out of it. And you know, we'd love to be able to have your brand. Yeah, okay, great.

Joelly Goodson :

I will definitely Come in, see you on compose. And, Rachel, good luck because you're starting on this new adventure. You guys are amazing. I love following both of you and seeing all your posts. So thank you again, maybe we'll have you back on here. When you become famous TV stars, and you can share your new TV show with us, the universe. It's out there in the universe happening. So Okay, awesome. Well, thank you guys again, and we will see you in clubhouse and on like, thank you so much. Really, you're amazing. We appreciate you. Oh, thank you. Okay, bye. There you have it. I really hope you enjoyed the conversation and maybe learned a few things to help you with your branding. But most of all, I really hope you had some fun. This show is a work in progress. So please make sure to rate and review on whatever platform you listen to. And if you want to learn more about the branding badass, that's me. You can find me on social media under you know it, branding badass. Thanks again. And until next time, here's to all you badasses out there.