Branding Matters

Aiden Lang - Show Your Pride

June 04, 2021 Branding Badass Season 1 Episode 27
Branding Matters
Aiden Lang - Show Your Pride
Show Notes Transcript

Today I’m sitting down with a very special guest who is near and dear to my heart. His name is Aiden Lang, and he is a proud member of the LGBTQ+ community. He’s also one of Calgary’s most celebrated drag queens under the age of 18. And most important of all, Aiden is my son.

Since the ripe old age of 14, Aiden (aka Crystal Guyser) has been performing at popular all ages drag venues around town; the most famous one being the main stage at Calgary Pride.

I invited Aiden to be a guest on my show to help celebrate Pride Month. We thought this would be a great opportunity to share his journey on how he created the Crystal Guyser brand. As you will soon discover, Aiden is anything BUT shy. And his story is one we can all learn from when it comes to living our authentic truth.

Joelly Goodson :

Hi, I'm Joelly your Branding Badass, and welcome to my new podcast. Branding Matters. Today I'm sitting down with a very special guest who is near and dear to my heart. His name is Aiden Lang. And I invited him to be on my show today to help celebrate the beginning of Pride Month. Not only is Aiden part of the LGBTQ plus community, but he's also one of Calgary's most celebrated drag queens under the age of a team. And most important of all, he is also my son, and I am so proud to have him here with me today. Since the ripe old age of 14, Aiden, who is known as Crystal Guyser has been performing at popular all ages, drag venues around town, the most famous one being the mainstage at Calvary Pride, I invited Aiden to be guests on my show, to talk about his brave journey. As you will soon discover, Aiden is anything but shy. And he wants to take this opportunity to share his story with you here today. And what a story it is. Aiden, I'm so excited to have you here with me today. Welcome to Branding Matters.

Aiden Lang:

Thanks for having me. You've been working so hard. And you know, you always support me with whatever I do. So I wanted to support you. Right, good. And it's fun being the guest was the star of the show.

Joelly Goodson :

Well, you're the star today. And I'm really excited to have you here. And this is so fun. And you know, I figured with pride month, I couldn't think of a better guest to have on so thanks for being here and for sharing your story with everybody. So let's get right to it. Are you nervous?

Aiden Lang:

I'm excited.

Joelly Goodson :

Okay, good.Well, don't be nervous. I won't divulge anything. And I can always edit it out if I'm happy with it. So. Okay, so Aiden, you came out at the ripe old age of 12 years old and came out to me, you came out to your friends actually, it's funny. Just quickly, I'll share a quick story if that's okay, how you came out to me, I was over at a friend's house and I got a text from you. And you're like, Mom, I have something to tell you. And but I don't want to talk. Don't ask me questions, and I don't want to share and I'm like, okay, and you're like, I'm gay. And then I'm like, okay, and I'm like, well, we're going to talk about it. And, you know, and I can ask you the typical questions, how do you know and everything else, right? And, and then I said, well, we're going to talk about it. And then I said, so and you go, don't tell anybody. So I said, Okay, and I said, I was just curious. I said, so who have you told, and then you send me a list of like 30 people that you had told. So I think

Aiden Lang:

that's funny, too, that I sent you a list? Because I mean, now I don't give you answers like that. But I think like I for something like this, like I pretty much knew like every person, I was like this person, this person, this person, this person, this person.

Joelly Goodson :

Now you're 17 going to be 18 soon. So it's crazy to think how time has flown since then. So when did you say that? You honestly knew that you were gay? When I was 11? You knew for sure when you're 11? What was it that made? You know, at 11 years old?

Aiden Lang:

I don't know. I think there were multiple factors. And I think it was just, you know, more. So just feeling different. And not knowing like what that is. And then I was a very resourceful person with access to a lot of things. So I was able to mean like the internet. Yes, yeah, that's okay. To do my own research. And I mean, it was even as simple as like, when watching a movie, they'd be kissing scene. And I'd be like, yep, but then if there was like a gay kissing scene, or a daisy or anything, it would either and that would feel different. And so what like watching it. And so that was kind of indicators. I remember just kind of being in the car one day, just like driving and just looking out the window and just being like, yeah,

Joelly Goodson :

yeah. Wow. That's incredible. But I mean, they said a lot of people say they knew when they were super young. I remember when you were nine. It's funny when so when you came out, and we told people, a lot of people were not terribly surprised. Not that you were not that there was anything growing up that you know, was I was a pretty flamboyant kid. Well, you say flamboyant. But it's interesting, because you were my first son, my firstborn. Right? So I'd never had a child before. So when you want it, it's also you're okay, sir, I'll

Aiden Lang:

let you know. It's okay. I was just gonna say cuz I know you're gonna talk about like, you know, Anna, and Anna's house and like, the dresses and dressing up and all that and it's very just, young kid things to do. And I agree, it is very, like I say, I call that flamboyant. But it's like, everyone likes playing dress up. Like, you know, no matter what, I just happen to dress up in my cousin's dresses, you know, and would force my little brother to do the same thing. So it was, it's, I think, honestly, I don't think it's really fair to make assumptions, like, you know, whatever, because kids will just be kids, you know, and you can never really know. However, I was fair in this instance.

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, but you were what I was gonna say is, I mean, you know, so you dressed up in dresses, Princess dresses when you were a toddler till you're quite young.

Aiden Lang:

I remember very vividly, Well, not really, very vividly, but I remember the moment when I didn't fit in them anymore. I remember legally be so big on me. And then I went to put them on one day and I couldn't get my foot in. Now I have my own pair of shoes on you.

Joelly Goodson :

What I was going to talk about specifically was when you were nine years old, this is crazy. And you know, you've always been at a theater too. And you made me that dress. Remember, you're like, I want to make your dress and you made me a dress from scratch. And you said this is going to be your dress that you're going to wear when I win the Academy

Aiden Lang:

Award. No, it wasn't this is that was your sunbathing dress. I had a design. Oh, I still remember. I could literally draw it out for you. Oh, it was gonna be like a white dress. And it had like snowflakes as white and like, elegant. Okay, like, Oh, yeah, I probably could still.

Joelly Goodson :

That's amazing.

Aiden Lang:

I remember that. So that was the Academy Award.

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, you made me that yellow, yellow sign that I still have by the way.

Aiden Lang:

I always box for a little bit. I was worried that like you would lost it. Because I remember like trying to use it, or show it off or wherever. So we finished dinner, whatever in the Netherlands pull up a sewing machine. And yeah,

Joelly Goodson :

And when you set your mind to something you go for, and you know, there's nothing you can do so. So needless to say, when you came out at 12, it wasn't a total shocker. But of course, there's always questions. And I think I asked you all the standard questions. How do you know? And who did you tell and all the rest? So when you did finally tell me I mean, were you nervous about my reaction?

Aiden Lang:

I don't think I was nervous. I just I think I just didn't really want it to be a thing. I didn't really need to be thing. No one has to come out as straight. Right? So it's not really fair that I have to come out. Yeah. So I just kind of didn't really want it to be a thing. It's like not nothing. But you know, it's not that I'm ashamed of it. And not whatever. I mean, it was really hard back then. It's still hard now. But I have a mind of my own. And I'm able to think for myself and understand, you know, situations better. But I think when I when I came out or whatever I was, yeah, I was 12 years old. And it was like very confusing.

Joelly Goodson :

It was the hardest person to tell.

Aiden Lang:

I think I remember probably being my dad. Why? I honestly don't know. I think it's just one of those things where it's like, I've always gravitated towards girls, you know, most of my Well, not most of my friends but my closest friends have always been girls. Yeah. Well, except once I got to high school, but like, yeah, I've Well,

Joelly Goodson :

when you were when you were in preschool and elementary school,

Aiden Lang:

all your close friends are grown. Yeah. And so I just I don't know, I just always clicked with him more. And it's easier for me to be vulnerable. He's with me to open up. It's easier for all that stuff. And my love My dad, but it was just like one of the things that's just like very personal and vulnerable. And it was fine.

Joelly Goodson :

It was fine. I think it was fine with everybody. Right? Pretty much. So was there anybody that you told Who's that reaction? surprised you? wasn't what you expected? either good or bad?

Aiden Lang:

I don't think so. I think most people weren't really surprised. Some people were like, what are some people were like, Yeah, but like when I was like 12. And and and around that point in my life, I was very outgoing. And then when I when I got a little bit Well,

Joelly Goodson :

you let me just correct that you've always been. I think since you were since you could speak.

Aiden Lang:

Yeah. So no, I don't think I didn't really get nobody surprised you? No, no, because

Joelly Goodson :

everybody was supportive and was like, yeah, no big deal. And right. Okay, so then fast forward two years after that. When you turn 14, you come to me again. And this time you're like, Mom, I have something to tell you. And I'm like, Yes. And you're like, I'm a drag queen. And I don't remember this. And I said you mean you want to be a drag queen when you want be like no, I am a drag queen and my name is Crystal geyser. And I was like, okay, and again, I don't know if I ever asked you this question either. So what got you interested in drag to begin with and how do you choose the name and why do you choose the name the crystal geyser?

Aiden Lang:

book, Crystal geyser? It's crystal geyser. Okay. My Instagram is the crystal geyser. Okay. I think it was honestly like, seeing drag race online. I don't know. I remember my will the first exposure I ever had to drag was all the way back in our old house. We were watching movies. Remember the movie? birdcages?

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, of course. The bird cage. bird cage.

Aiden Lang:

Yeah. So I mean, we've seen that a lot of times, but I remember like, we watched in the den so long. Yeah. And that was like my first time seeing dragons. And I remember being really confused, because you guys were telling me that they were boys. And I was like, what? They're not all men. And you guys really are their pronunciation. I was like, shocked by that. And I was like, yeah, so that was ingrained in my head. And it was always kind of fascinating to me. And it wasn't even dragged that I got interested in his makeup. And you know, I just I've seen a lot of people online. I mean, it's just one of those things that you're just bombarded with online. So I figured I can give it a shot too. You know, it's never for this. It was never an obstacle of like, Oh, I'm a boy. So I can't do that. I've I've always not really cared. It was like, I want to do it. So I'm gonna do it.

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, it just appealed to you. And so you decided you want to try?

Aiden Lang:

Yeah, I didn't know a lot about makeup. I didn't know like, whatever I mean, but like I knew like the essentials, you know, and with theater and stuff. I had an idea but like, not really. So I just I ordered a few things and I watched a lot of videos online. And for a little bit there. I just tried to do makeup and I was it was fine. I mean, it was the makeup of someone who was just learning to do makeup. So you know, and then there was kind of a shift. I don't really know exactly where but I just started to see more and more makeup show up and there started to be more and more inspiration everywhere and a lot more drag in it. kind of slowly crept its way into my life. And I just was like, one day and you know, I had the supplies. So I was like, let's just try it out. I just didn't want to. And I was like, bam. And so I when I told you, I was a drag queen, I think back when I said that I was probably like bawling, and super excited and super proud. And now I look back, and it's like, but it's funny too, because I would see pictures online of Queens. And but yeah, and like, be inspired by them and watch what they do over and over again, like, try and teach myself that but also, you know, like, I would just see pictures of these queens who were just like, beautiful, and they were put together, it wasn't sloppy, you know, I was like, every aspect was thought out. And when I first started, you know, I do like half my face of makeup in my bedroom and take a picture of it and call it drag now that I'm older, and like I've actually kind of established myself and I have a better idea of what I'm doing. I look at the pictures. And it's like I am what I want it to be, you know, and that is definitely like I'll be proud of because I remember looking at pictures, pictures of myself that I look like now. And I'm just like, like, I was like oh my god, like they know. Wow. And now I look like that. And it, at least to me, and it makes me really happy. And the name I love I love watching behind the scenes stuff, not just ripples, but of anything, you know, movies, TV shows, whatever. I want to see how it's made, or just like how they act in real life. You know, because anything, anything. This is not how my mom and I talk guys, believe me. Nothing is real. But this is how we talk. You're so right, mom, this is exactly what do you mean, this is? How we talk the pitch the position that we're sitting, how

Joelly Goodson :

are you mean? Like? Oh, yeah. Well, what it looks sorry,

Aiden Lang:

what it sounds like we do have conversations. I'm

Joelly Goodson :

sorry. Yeah. Okay. I just want to be clear. what you meant by that is we're sitting in a in my office slash recording studio with a microphone doing this. We don't always want to do this. But no, we were talking we talk and I asked you questions. Well, this is specific.

Aiden Lang:

Yeah. Yeah. You don't I mean, yeah, so anyways, TV, it's not real. Yeah. And so I find it really interesting. Being able to humanize the character or humanize anyone long story short, I was watching the behind the scenes of I think it was like before the finale of like a crowning or something. And one of the Queen's Katya some electrica Yeah, it was like a before the crown for crying. And she was doing a hotel room tour because I have to be in hotels, and they have to, like they can't see each other and, and she had a water bottle cooler, like, you know, like an office cooler God, and she had his waistband. And she was like taking around. She was like, This is my cooler waist and whatever. And then she read the name. And it was crystal geyser. And she was like, That's such a good trade name. And me being like, the 13 year old who was like, I love you guys are so smart. I was like, Wow, you're like You're so right. Yeah. How did you just do that? That's crazy. You're so true. That's that's how I got my name. Except I changed it. I tried to be clever. And I spoke to geysers. g you Why? Yeah, that was kind of funny.

Joelly Goodson :

I want to talk a bit about your makeup. Because you talked about how you looked online. Everybody asked me all the time. First of all, when you were younger, you started they asked me if I did your makeup. And it's like, like, I don't really well, you

Aiden Lang:

would also ask you who would do my makeup. I know we'd come upstairs at like 10am before a show fully dressed and you'd be like, Who did you meet up?

Joelly Goodson :

Did I? Yeah, I don't remember that. Well, so and you learned all yourself, right? All the makeup video you learned through YouTube? on YouTube?

Aiden Lang:

Yes. And actually, I kind of lied to you. Because I'm remembering back my first like experience with drag, like because I had started to get interested in makeup. And I started kind of getting ish into drag. So my cousin's really good friend was a makeup artist, or not at least like a makeup artist. But she's like, she's very involved with the art role in the queer community and like, whatever. And she put me in drag for the first time, like, actually, and she like changed my face. I looked totally different. Put me in a wig. And that was my first experience. And after that, after seeing myself like transition like that, I was like, holy crap, I need to do this. And then after that, like I just yeah, I went home, I tried to recreate it. And I just started doing it myself. And I wouldn't watch honestly a lot of videos even like, I mean, yeah, videos are helpful and tutorials are good, but like, I find watching a tutorial can be a little frustrating because you don't do it exactly how they're doing it and you cannot fully understand or seek it can be like, so what I really did, like the way that I really taught myself makeup was by just like looking at pictures and just trying to do it and figuring my own way of doing it. Your way of doing something is not my way to do something. It might it might not work. And so I found Yeah, that was definitely the best way so I might not have the best techniques for everything. But at the end of the day, I can make myself

Joelly Goodson :

for you. Sure. Oh, I didn't know that. That's great. Your makeup is amazing. Like I said people comment on it all the time and compliment you on it and you do a fantastic job. And those cheekbones not

Aiden Lang:

even not on the argument. I'm always always grateful to you because I've definitely given me

Joelly Goodson :

well you can thank my mother for those cheekbones, the cheekbones. Yeah. Okay, then let's talk about drag a little bit more. Paul's drag race premiered in 2009. You were five years old when it premier drag used to be sort of in the dark and hidden and not talked about and now it's pretty mainstream. Why do you think that is?

Aiden Lang:

I think for a lot of reasons, but I think too, it wasn't not talked about. It wasn't known about, you know, it was, I mean, it was known that

Joelly Goodson :

it was more in the gay community. Well, that's

Aiden Lang:

exactly what I'm saying it was gated something super, in the gay community, it was a way for people to escape, it was a way for people to express themselves freely, it was a way to party with their friends, you know, in a safe space and not have to worry about getting arrested in the streets, and you know, whatever, it has a whole history because when it was around, unfortunately, you know, people don't didn't feel how they feel now towards gay people, and they had to hide. And you know, whenever you're in, some people are in a crappy situation, they always find they find ways to bring light into it, you know, and that was one thing. And I think once time started change, I mean, I didn't, I don't really remember like, seeing it, because like you said, I was like, five, six, but like, in my world, the world that I live in, the expectation is to be accepting. And that's the norm, and you're weird if you if you hate on people, like that's not cool anymore, you know. And so because of that drag, because it's such a fun, colorful, amazing thing. And RuPaul was able to bring it he was able to bring it out of a certain light and show it to the world and show them how much of an art form that it is. And not just men dressing up in heels like it is an art form and it takes skill and takes work and I think people love it and I think people

Joelly Goodson :

clearly they do because he's it's won numerous awards and it's International.

Aiden Lang:

Exactly. And I think it's it's incredible having it out there because I think it made people able to find funding. So it was it was a way for people to feel less alone every episode you know, they they have lots of stories that they share, people go through a lot brings people together and it brings people at home watching together. And so that's why I think it became so popular because so many people were able to relate to the people on the show. And and yeah, like you said it was something new and it was something fun, and it was elegant. And it was it was insane. Now it's it's just like anything else and it's evolved, it's evolved. You know, it's evolved more than just like the gay club scene, you know, it is an art form, and it's not fun for anyone.

Joelly Goodson :

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Aiden Lang:

Yeah, you know, and I think because it is an art form Remi is not fair to gate keep I definitely have thought about this subject a lot. I'm not gonna lie because you know, it does have a history and it does have significance. And I think as long as you know that and understand like, where it comes from and why it's a you know, such a staple in the gay community then it should be for everyone. You know, I think absolutely because times change all the time. The world is constantly changing and so you can't be stuck in your ways. It's just important to know the history of work, you know where it comes from, why why it is how it is.

Joelly Goodson :

Okay, so everything you said I agree with totally. But there are critics out there who think that children and I say children because anybody under the age of A teen should not be performing jag. What do you think about that? Do you think I mean, I'm sure there's probably people that are listening right now, and maybe are aghast. But the fact that you know, I let you do drag when you were 14 now you're 17 and you've performed all over Calgary, you've performed that gay pride, you know, you've emceed a bunch of shows. And there's a lot of critics out there that don't think that's appropriate. What do you have to say about that?

Aiden Lang:

Yeah, you know, I can definitely I understand where they're coming from, to a degree, I think it's ridiculous in the sense that like, if they if their only idea of drag is man in a dress, and like a skimpy dress, you know, doing whatever I can understand how they wouldn't want their kids doing that. But that's why it's important to educate yourself. Like if your kid is like this, or you know, whatever, listen to your kid, it's not about wanting to get on stage and be all sexy, or whatever. It's about wanting to express yourself, showing the world who you are in a different light, and doing what you love, whether it be for being worried about how the world might react. Like it's I don't think it's fair for someone to stop someone doing it. Because of that for any reason, there is absolutely no harm in you putting on a tutu and a wig. And going up on stage and seeing that you're hurt out. I think, honestly, with youth drag, I think it's amazing for the space that it creates and provides for people for younger kids who might feel that they don't have a safe place. Or they might they don't have a place that they can go to and be accepted by everyone and be able to relate to someone because being validated having your feeling validated is one of the best feelings in the world. You know, especially when your kid and you don't know what's going on ever. So I do think it creates a really good or really nice environment and

Joelly Goodson :

a sense of community, a sense of community. Do you think that it's possible to perform drag and do performances without being sexual without dressing provocatively, and getting up there?

Aiden Lang:

The majority of performances aren't sexual. If anything, I'm the problem at the show. I'm the one who likes to push the edges, the push the boundaries, okay. Because it's, you know, it's like, it's so Yeah, I agree. It is just art. And I've done I do like a lot of contemporary pieces, too. You know, it's like I did one from a Broadway show, I did a show with the song from a Broadway show with like the Queen of Hearts, you know, and with that, I was able to do a whole thing and so it can be a whole project. It's not just shaking your ass and looking hot.

Joelly Goodson :

Now you also are an emcee a lot of the times now because you've created a brand and we this show is called branding matters. We're going to get to that but so you've created this brand crystal geyser people know you, you know people like to come and see you. I'm extremely proud of how much you've accomplished in such a such a young age. In addition to that, I noticed that a lot of your fan base our teenage girls Remember to go in and one show where they got to do remember when it was intermission, and the audience was able to come up and meet and get an autograph. And there was this I walk up and there's this huge lineup. And they're all tweens and teenage girls. Why do you think that is? Why do you think there's such a fascination and that tends to be the target?

Aiden Lang:

I honestly I think it's just a lot of them just like watch drag race and they just love it. And I think they're just super supportive and super excited about it. And it's sweet.

Joelly Goodson :

I'm just curious, you know why you think it's that demographics like why teenage girls specifically,

Aiden Lang:

it's like a novelty to that like puppy in a teacup. Just so cute. And just so amazing. And just like, Oh my gosh, like, and it's just something to gawk at.

Joelly Goodson :

Well, coming from a branding perspective, because that's the lens that I look at it. Let's talk about the crystal geyser brand. Because you know, they say your brand is your reputation. It's what people say about you when you're not in the room, very famous quote by Jeff Bezos. So let's talk about the crystal geyser brand. Because I think one of the reasons that you do have such a following is because you're able to connect with your audience. You know, when you get up on stage, Aiden, I mean, you own that stage, right? And you get the whole audience cheering for you. What is it about the crystal geyser brand? Do you think that is so infectious, if I'm being honest, When I've talked to you about Crystal

Aiden Lang:

Crystal is loud and outgoing. And people prefer Guyser and when you get up and drag, and we've had lots of that. I mean, it's no fun to be no fun personal conversations, and you had said to me what I love about it is because it's like a metamorphosis and you say you like becoming someone else? What is it about becoming someone else that you'd like? Yeah, it's a different books completely different person comes out. You know, Crystal, you're not the same person Aiden's very calm. I think I are like, chill. I refuse to describe myself and more masculine. I mean, I guess that's like obvious, but I mean, if I'm being totally honest, one thing that I do notice is my flamboyant side comes when I'm Crystal I'm not I'm not the same person when I'm with my gay friends versus when I'm with like friends from school

Joelly Goodson :

talking about metamorphosis. Can we talk about metamorphosis, the show that you co wrote and co directed and started, can you share with everybody about metamorphosis and what it is and how much of you Aiden is in that?

Aiden Lang:

Yeah, well, metamorphosis was a show that I wrote with my friend a few years ago for the company for cover young people's theatre, and they have a cannibal festival every year. It's a student, written, directed, starred Show. It's really fun. And so my friend and I sat down one day, and we're Well, I mean, actually, I had the idea for a show with the drag queen in Cannonball. And it was basically about this kid Felix who comes out to his parents, and they don't like it. And then he goes to a gay club, and is introduced to, you know, three beautiful drag queens. And so they teach her something about herself along with drag. And at the end, Felix transforms magically into Felicity, and it's really fun. And it's really, it was a really fun experience.

Joelly Goodson :

That's great. I'm so proud of you. I mean, I tell you that all the time, but I just can't tell you enough. Can you describe the crystal advisor brand? Well,

Aiden Lang:

I mean, to be honest, I didn't really think about branding a lot before. But you know, since you started doing this podcast, it's definitely been something that I've started to take into consideration.

Joelly Goodson :

Well, you probably didn't even really know much. But Brandon, even worse, did you?

Aiden Lang:

I had a little bit somewhat of an idea. But I mean, listening to your podcast, I've definitely learned a few things. So do a really good job with that. Well, thank you. Um, but I think, you know, Crystal geyser is fun, she's energetic, she's inspirational. And I like to think I don't know, when people think of me or watch me perform on stage. I just want them to feel happy and inspired and obviously entertained, you know, and I think I do a pretty good job of that most times.

Joelly Goodson :

Oh, my God, you do an amazing job of it. You know, what if that's, if that's what you're thinking the crystal geyser brand is I can definitely say you are right on the money. Because when you're not around, people are always talking about how exciting your your performance was, and how they feel energized after watching you. So that's really good. And I'm really honored to hear that you say that you've learned some stuff about branding from listening to my podcast. That means a lot to me, because that's why I'm doing it. What do you think sets crystal geyser apart from all the other drag queens?

Aiden Lang:

She's a badass. But no, seriously, I think I think what sets her apart is that she's an entertainer first, and a drag queen. Second. And what I mean by that is, I think because of my theatrical background, you know, I've been performing on stage like I've said before, since I was six years old. So I'm, I'm accustomed to the stage, I feel home when I'm there. I know how to own the stage. There's some queens out there who have that same experience, you know, they're obviously they're going to have dance backgrounds who have who have backgrounds in performing arts. And there's some things you don't you know, they're more so like social media, Queens, or they're more So look, Queens, they pay they they put a lot into their aesthetics and whatnot, which is great. I mean, there's some beautiful queens out there. Yeah. But there are also some beautiful green queens who are not amazing performers. I definitely think that my my theater background has helped me a lot.

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, I would say that too. I mean, just to interject for a second here. And when you say that it but I was thinking about some of the performances that you've done in the past. I mean, one of my favorite performances, you were in a different character. I mean, you get into character so well, and you get up on stage and you literally it's more I think of it as a performance. I don't even think that it's you there, you know, like I mean, Well, no. And that's the whole point.

Aiden Lang:

I think one thing that I am able to so easily integrate, you know, my theater background is because it is acting, it is performing Christo and Aiden are not the same person. And that's, that's one of my favorite parts of drag, you know, is the persona as being someone else, you know, putting on the mask and going up on stage and acting my heart. Oh, basic. Yeah, essentially, in just another way, you know, your medium?

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah. What would be the one word to describe the crystal geyser brand, then Encore.

Aiden Lang:

Encore? is how I would I would imagine people describe my shows. And I think that's the impression that I like to leave, you know, and not just

Joelly Goodson :

leaving them wanting more. Exactly. I love it. Exactly. That's great. Okay, well, that's very good. Thank you so much. I appreciate you sharing that. Yes. I think crystal geyser has a really strong brand. And since the show is about branding, and especially if being pride month now having you on here to share all about your experience. And then obviously talking about the brand is very important. And I'm glad that you've learned some stuff along the way to

Aiden Lang:

know it's been it's been really fun to watch you, you know, do your thing and get success in it. You know, and a lot of the people that you've interviewed have been really interesting. And yeah, glad to be here. Yeah, it's been fun. Yeah. Awesome. excited to be part of it.

Joelly Goodson :

Okay, cool. Before we end here, I just want to know, so for any parent out there that's listening. What advice would you give a young person who is interested in dragon who wants to get into the drag performance world? What advice would you give the child and what advice would you give their parents?

Aiden Lang:

For parent I think I'd say be open, be accepting and like, you know, have conversation with them and understand, you know, what's appropriate and what's not appropriate and how it relates to safety, not just you controlling them because I think you know, I made this might not be everyone but I don't like being told what to do. Even if even if I can't see a lot. I

Joelly Goodson :

think that's every team wide. You

Aiden Lang:

know, I'm sure I'm sure it is. I don't I don't like being told I can't do something and if you say that I probably We will do it anyways. So I was just having conversation with them, you know, and explaining and talking to them and explaining how it can be still dangerous and but how you can make it fabulous and amazing without making it sexual going through shows, you know, being there for them, whatever they need,

Joelly Goodson :

and what advice would you give to their kids?

Aiden Lang:

And to the kids? I would say, you know, go for it. Do you like that ever stops me really just, you know, starting? And I would say just go out? And do not I know, this is really hard to do. But don't compare yourself to everyone else, you know, try and learn from everyone and be your own person, come up with your own persona and figure out who you are.

Joelly Goodson :

That's great advice. So what's your favorite part about drag?

Aiden Lang:

Like I said before, it's the transformation. It's not being? Well, actually, no, my favorite part of drag, but it's like, just like my favorite thing in life period. There is no way to describe the feeling, but it is like pure joy of just having like 10s or hundreds or 1000s of people like screaming in your face. applauding oh my gosh, because I said I know you said before, like, I performed a Calgary pride two years ago on this like on princess Island, which is just like a stage and like this huge field, it was packed. And that same weekend or like around that same time I performed at twisted, which is like the gay nightclub in Calgary.

Joelly Goodson :

It was an all ages.

Aiden Lang:

Yeah, it was an all ages show. And I was hosting it and I performed and the venue was packed to the back door of the stages at the back and it was packed all the way to the front. Those two moments are like, ingrained in my head. Because there is no other feeling like it having that many people screaming and applauding you is just like incredible. Well, I feel unstoppable.

Joelly Goodson :

You know, it's so funny that you say that because I don't know if you remember this, you probably do because you have memory like a vault when you first started performing. So you were how old when you started theater? And the first play was Wizard of Oz. Right? And I remember afterwards and you played the mayor,right?

Aiden Lang:

No, I was the corner of Papi, ASEAN and a jitterbug.

Joelly Goodson :

Right. Okay, he was the corner is thick enough. And I remember when you came off, and I said, how you know, when you were done, and I said, so how was it and you were like, I can't explain it. But being up on that stage. It was like, I just feel this like excitement through my whole body. Remember, you didn't know how to describe the feeling but you just were like the tingling. You were just like, I can't describe it. But the whole feeling through my whole body is just like, amazing.

Aiden Lang:

No, I totally remember that. It's the same thing. I can't really explain the

Joelly Goodson :

performer. There's no doubt. Well, so COVID has been a real drag for you. I know. No pun intended. I know it's been really tough for you not being able to perform now. You haven't done it for a while. Do you think when things get back to normal, you're gonna go back out there and start doing it again.

Aiden Lang:

Yeah, hopefully COVID kind of like while it was chilling, there have been like a few opportunities as a kid about to go into grade 12 in a pandemic, you know, there's a lot of things in life and I got to do and so you know, it's not my priority right now. I still love it with the passion but high school also kicks your butt. So I don't know honestly, I don't know. I still miss performing and I guess when I just have less stress in my life Yes, I can I'm able to just go for fall out because I do miss it. And I I want to get back into it really badly.

Joelly Goodson :

Would you ever consider auditioning for repurposed drag race or the Canadian version?

Aiden Lang:

Well, you do have to be 19 No, I mean, well, I would ever but not when I turned 19 No, no, I have plans. Other things I want to do and I don't have a goal you know, I respect the Queen's who like the end all be all goal is to get on that show. It's not for me, I think it'd be really fun but I'm not someone who's like I need to be on that show. I'm not gonna say at the bottom of the list because if the opportunity came I'm not going to tell you I wouldn't do it but I'm not like eager for it. But I would never say no you know i would love obviously obviously love to be on TV and like be second your cast not even a first episode but the second you cast your on the map globally. The moment that like the cast is announced Your life will change and I can handle the spotlight so I wouldn't be mad about that. But in just like a sense of like my drag. I don't I don't think it would be something like I feel like I'd need to do right away. Okay.

Joelly Goodson :

Well, you know, you have my support if and when you ever decide to do that or Sweetie, thank you for spending this time with me and doing this interview and being so open and honest and articulate if people want to learn more about the crystal geyser. How can they find you?

Aiden Lang:

They can follow me on Instagram at the crystal geyser and find me on Facebook crystal geyser. Yeah, catch me around town.

Joelly Goodson :

All right. Well, thank you again. I love having you on here and I hope everybody has a great pride. And hopefully this year we'll be able to think safe wearing our masks and celebrating from a distance can be gay but stay away. Okay,well thanks again, sweetie. Yeah, well,

Aiden Lang:

thanks for having me. Okay.

Joelly Goodson :

Love you.

Aiden Lang:

Love you, too.

Joelly Goodson :

And there you have it. I really hope you enjoy the conversation and maybe learned a few things to help you with your branding. But most of all, I really hope you had some fun. This show is a work in progress. So please make sure to rate and review on whatever platform you listen to. And if you want to learn more about the branding badass, that's me, you can find me on social media under you know it, branding badass. Thanks again and until next time, here's to all you badasses out there.