Branding Matters

Christine Lieu - Unlock The Power of Pinterest

April 16, 2021 Branding Badass Season 1 Episode 20
Branding Matters
Christine Lieu - Unlock The Power of Pinterest
Show Notes Transcript

My guest today is Christine Lieu, the founder and President of CL Designs; a design and branding company that helps start-ups and small businesses level up and boost sales. At the ripe old age of 30, Christine was recently named in Yahoo News as one of the Top 10 Graphic Designers to Watch in 2021. She has been nominated for RBC'S Women of Influence Award and a won a Digital Publishing Award for her work in Maclean’s Magazine. 

When Christine's not busy helping her clients with their branding, she is hosting her Brand Party Podcast, where she and her guests deliver fun, honest, to-the-point advice that listeners can implement in their entrepreneurial journey.

I invited Christine to be a guest on my show to talk about Pinterest. I wanted to learn why it’s such and important and under-utilized branding platform. And I was curious to learn what role Pinterest plays in helping brands grow their audience in the digital space.

Thanks for listening! If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a 5-star rating along with a brief review.

I'd love to hear from you so let's connect!
Insta - @Branding_Badass
LinkedIn - Joelly Goodson
Website - BrandingMatters.ca

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Hi I'm Joelly your Branding Badass, welcome to my new podcast Branding Matters. My guest today is Christine Lew, the founder and president of seal designs a design and branding company that helps startups and small businesses level up and boost their sales at the ripe old age of 30. Christine was recently named in Yahoo News, top 10 graphic designers to watch in 2021. She's also been nominated for rbcs woman of influence award and won a digital publishing Award for her work in Maclean's magazine. And when she's not busy helping her clients with their branding, Christine is hosting her own podcast called brand party Podcast, where she and her guests deliver fun, honest to the point advice that listeners can implement right away on their entrepreneurial journey. I invited Christine to be a guest on my show to talk about Pinterest. I wanted to learn why it's such an important and yet such an underutilized branding platform. And I was curious to learn what role Pinterest plays in helping brands grow their audience in the digital space. Christine, I'm so excited to have you here. So welcome to branding matters.

Christine Lieu:

Thank you so much, Joelly. And I cannot wait to dive in.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Thank you for asking to be on my podcast because I know honestly, I get tons of people that request but I'm so glad that we connected and that we're doing. So let's dive right in congrats on being named one of the top 10 graphic designers to watch in 2021. How excited are you?

Christine Lieu:

It's definitely a great way to kick off the year. I'm not gonna lie. But yeah, thank you so much for being open. Also to having me on here. I know, it's not necessarily your typical guests. But I hope that the perspective and experience that I bring all your listeners are able to take a golden nugget out ofit.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

I'm really looking to bring experts like yourself in all different fields, leaders and all different industries, who are successful. And branding is that nugget that brings everybody together, right. And that's sort of the basis to help other people that are out there right now that are struggling. And you and I talked about that when we first met you have a strong, strong expertise. I love your branding itself. And so you're you're actually exactly what I want. So I appreciate it. Okay, so can you back up and give us a little bit of your history have been did you study design in school, or what's your background,

Christine Lieu:

I always the coloring contest champion, I like to say growing up. And so literally art and creativity has been in my blood since I was born in a way I didn't necessarily know that it might have translated into graphic design necessarily, I sort of fell into that in itself. But I started my first business as a streetwear apparel brand called in lieu of so it's a lot of fun spin off of my last name about nine years ago now.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

You're 20

Christine Lieu:

Yes around there, when I was just graduating from high school into university and taking a few different business entrepreneurial programs at the time between Kingston where I'm from, as well as Toronto, while going to school full time. And so basically, I took over my parents house and silk screened from the basement bathroom and took over the whole living room went to trade show selling everything in between this is pre drop shipping days. So you can only imagine the type of business that you're doing as well. So I definitely have a big appreciation for people in apparel. It's a big piece on its own. But basically, from there, what really got me into design originally was I wanted to do band merchandising, so CD sleeves, tour posters, merge, I love all the T shirts, I would hoard all of them after every single concert and just love the experience that I got from it. And the overall style as well from a graphic perspective. But you know, that industry has definitely evolved to what we see now with podcasting, right by that one by one inch square that you see instead of the big blown CD covers. So it's sort of evolved from there. And I want you to design for my Bachelor's of graphic designer at OCAD University here in Toronto, and I did not enjoy my time there, actually.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

So why didn't you enjoy it? Because

Christine Lieu:

I come from more of a fine art background originally. So a lot of drawing and painting actually. So that learning curve was extremely difficult for me transparently up front. And so I didn't know if I had it in me honestly, if this is something that I wanted to do, but graphic design was something viable in the creative space. I actually thought that I was going to switch to advertising my first year but they told me that I wanted to switch programs that I would need to go back and start all over again. Essentially I reapply and so my motivation to get my degree and finish my post secondary education was much more higher than me starting over essentially so

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Starting over at the ripe old age of 20, I guess yeah. In hindsight, you have incredible drive, obviously, What do your parents do?

Christine Lieu:

My dad's retired now he was in Environmental Services at the local hospital in Kingston. And my my mom actually works there as well, as a senior receptionist, also very different from Yeah.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

So when I get your entrepreneurial drive, do you think

Christine Lieu:

My grandparents on my mom's side, actually, so they owned a Vietnamese restaurant growing up as well. So they're immigrants to Canada. And so I think just that mentality of coming to a new country, you literally need to start over and create community, create connections, and really wanting to offer something valuable as well, from your experiences is really powerful. And so growing up with that sort of environment, I think, has really been instilled with me and everything that I do.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Yeah, that's amazing. Well, you've accomplished a lot. And so you had your strip or a brand. And what happened with that? Did you go directly from that to your business? Now,

Christine Lieu:

I actually didn't think I would ever become my own business owner, to be honest with you, Julie. So basically, I got a taste of what entrepreneurship was like owning your own business. It's a lot of work, right. And so I actually started working with different startups throughout my time in university freelancing. And that was much more appealing to me at that time, because I got to do 360 of everything, from marketing, to sales to everything in between designing without the pressure of owning your own business and the responsibilities that come along with it. So I actually thought that that was what were my path was going to be, but upon graduating, we need to get a quote unquote, real job. And so I ended up finding myself in corporate where I worked for Rogers media, publishing, and various household names, and then ended up at CBC music before I decided to take the leap to CL design to the brand party podcast now.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

And so what did you do in corporate? Were you a designer ready to these places? Is that what you did? And you were like an in house designer?

Christine Lieu:

Yeah, in house designer, and also at CBC music, I was a digital associate producer. Cool.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

That sounds like a fun job. Was it fun? I

Christine Lieu:

I mean, it's my 16 year old dream job. If you had asked me, then it's just so wonderful. But at the same time, I knew that there was more for me, and I'm always looking for the next challenge and what that is going to look like. So once I've hit that milestone, I'm always looking for what I can do to push that envelope a little bit more.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

So what was the impetus for you than to say, I'm going to go out and do this on my own now and start seal design.

Christine Lieu:

So I had been freelancing for about five plus years at that point, on and off while I was working corporate and in university taking that transition after like a side job and another side job and juggling everything in the air. But, you know, I always joke that I just get bored easily.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

I know,

Unknown:

As a creative, right, there's always so much to learn. And just being naturally curious has drawn me to these different adventures and different paths in my life and career that I'm genuinely excited for. And I know that in a corporate setting anyways, that I can always go back to it. So for me, at this stage of my life, I really want to explore what it looks like to own my own business and be able to help different people along the way.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Well, and you've been great at it. SoI want to talk about Pinterest. Can you tell us a bit what exactly it is? Why you're on there and why businesses should go on there?

Christine Lieu:

Yeah, absolutely. It's definitely one of those underrated platforms. I'm very guilty of it myself, I had avoided so long, right. And it seems kind of mysterious in a way of a platform. And so think of Pinterest, first of all, like a virtual search engine, just like Google, but visually. So there's so many different things that you can tap into from there. By utilizing Pinterest, you're able to grow exponentially with this platform, it will help boost your SEO and traffic to your website in particular. So I personally have seen up to 127% growth to my website by using Pinterest. And that's even just minimally integrating it into my everyday content process itself. So I'm just scratching the surface. So that just gives you an idea of what it can actually do for you and your business. Whether you are new to Pinterest, or you have been using it personally for maybe pinning those meal prep recipes. To even being a user who has over a million followers, I think you can still benefit from integrating Pinterest into your marketing strategies.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

So how does Pinterest differ from Instagram or other social media platforms

Unknown:

It's definitely keyword heavy. So because of that search engine optimization area, it definitely drives a lot more traffic specifically based on what people are naturally searching for. So it's a lot more intuitive, I would say because people are looking to pin to specific boards or different interests based on your ideal client or customer.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

So for example, you're on there. Would you put a post of a design that you've done? What would you post on there?

Christine Lieu:

Yeah, it ranges so there are specific boards that I have for the podcast itself to logo inspiration to color palettes to even website designs or layouts. From a design point of view, those are the boards that I have in place. And then also keeping in mind that my ideal client, they also really value self care actually, and having healthy boundaries within their business. So I actually have a self care board incorporated into my profile as well. So this just gives you some ideas of what you can think about incorporating that doesn't feel out of reach, but they're all actually helping you with the types of interests that your clients are already looking for.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

So you mentioned podcast, so you want to promote your podcast, you're new and you go on Pinterest, what kind of things you post on there? And how do you go from posting something about your podcast on Pinterest? And what do you post to attracting an audience? Can you walk us through that?

Christine Lieu:

Yeah, absolutely. That's a great question. So essentially, I would say it's particularly if you do have show notes on your website, this is a great way to have that cycle in terms of content generation and repurposing different content. So if you have a sound bite, for example, and you repurpose that content into an audio gram, so the waves for video graphics, you can post that on Pinterest as well. So you can do video on Pinterest. Exactly. So think of it as like, yeah, they're really serving out video content. So it's gonna definitely add some variety when people are scrolling through that will help you stand out. So this is a definitely a big driver for a podcast, I would say to definitely try it out.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

That's great on Pinterest, is it like Instagram, where you have also contact information? Or you know, because when I go on Pinterest, for example, I'll go on Pinterest, because I'll see a cool design or something I actually you're gonna laugh, but I put together a vision board and I did on Pinterest, because I thought I wanted on my phone that I can look at it, you know, and no, I didn't put COVID-19 on my vision board. You know, I made a vision board for 2020 and I collated inspirational quotes and pictures and things that I you know, vision board, let people do but I thought I gotta do it digitally. So have it there. And then I see that people are following it and doing it. And I didn't do it. I honestly did it. Before I started my podcast, it wasn't for business, it was just I'm going to make a vision board. I'm going to do it that way. So now changing that mindset to more of a business. How would you do that? Would you have that call to action?

Christine Lieu:

Yeah. So on your profile, you can add a bio section as well. So similarly to Instagram so that we can compare platforms. But essentially, I feel like this is a very underserved area. So make sure that you're putting clearly mind you because there is a character count on it to what you offer, who you're serving, and definitely add in your website from there so that you're driving that traffic again, at a touch point.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Who do you recommend should be on Pinterest? I mean, is it for everybody? Or is there different businesses that you think should stay away? Or what's your expertise on that?

Christine Lieu:

Yeah, product based businesses definitely do well there because it is so visually striking. But I would say as well, any sort of business that is looking for a boost in traffic, which which is everything. Yeah, especially now. Right?

Joelly Goodson Lang:

People are struggling to grow their business and to make. So every industry you would say really,

Christine Lieu:

I would say majority, it will help for sure. It's just how you position it and how you go about designing as well. Like they definitely cater towards a very clean aesthetic. So make sure that your headlines that you're putting on there, they're very purposeful, intentional, they're short, they're going to grab that attention right away as well. And that it's cohesive to what might be on your website, right so that when they do click, and then they want to find out more from there, that actually looks familiar to them so that it's not so jarring when they are going from platform to platform in terms of that traffic. But do keep in mind Pinterest is sort of a long game in a sense that it's at that very beginning of your funnel of that brand awareness piece that people are just learning about you. So you can't expect necessarily that they're going to convert right away into a sale or to a new client. It does take about on average, seven touch points for people to actually feel comfortable enough to take that next sales action. So don't feel like just because you're not getting immediate response from Pinterest that you might see on for example, Instagram, that's a little bit more fast track that you're not going to get discouraged from there.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

That's interesting. And I think the fact that it is like you said still pretty much under the radar for a lot of businesses, right? I mean, you're hearing now about businesses that are even slowly getting on tik tok big brands right are going on there. And there's I hear debates all the time about whether or not brands should be on tik tok because the target market that they're reaching out to don't want them there. And they're kind of like, what are you doing here? This is my Playhouse. And you know, you're not welcome here. Now speaking of houses, clubhouse, I mean, there's, there's so much there's so many but I always thought because your specialty is, you know, graphic design. And you know, you're very visual, obviously, and I saw you actually do a webinar about it, which and I found it really interesting. And I think for our listeners, there's a lot of people out there that probably don't use Pinterest for business. And so I would say correct me if I'm wrong, but there's still a lot of opportunity to get noticed because of that, you know, you're doing Have the digital saturation you might have with Instagram or whether the social media platforms.

Christine Lieu:

Yeah, absolutely. And the beauty of it with Pinterest as well as I keep serving evergreen content and especially so if you know that your content is really great for even seasonal stuff. So for example, Valentine's Day or Easter, so you can really help people in particular that if you have content that is specific for that, a lot of people who are on Pinterest, you're typically planning for something in advance, keep that in mind that if you have very curated content that it's going to do well, but also, it's going to continue serving long after you initially post it I've seen things do really, really well, even months from now that's still getting served out. So don't feel like you need to have something that's very timely even because I feel like the ones that are going to do really well are the ones that are evergreen working for you continuously. So even if you have a freebie for your email newsletter, for example, then it's a great way to incorporate it moving forward that's serving you long after you initially posted it and to make sure that you're collecting the insights as well. So do switch over to a business account, I would say to make sure that you're tracking that growth.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

That's great advice. Is there any industry or any brand that he should not be on there and be Is there any pictures or videos that you shouldn't be posting on Pinterest?

Christine Lieu:

I would say Pinterest is relatively family friendly, generally speaking, no inappropriate content. I don't know if I need to say that. But just for you know,

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Yeah, no, but you think Instagram I some of the posts I see on there.

Christine Lieu:

Keep in mind Pinterest is an extension of your brand at the end of the day. So if this isn't for you to only pin delicious droolworthy recipes anymore, so clean up your blood.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

That's what I think it is actually that's why that's a really good analogy, because I think people initially went to Pinterest to get recipes. We built a pergola in our backyard last summer, and I went on Pinterest to look at different pergolas. So things like that, where when you think about it, if I was a home builder, or permanent member, I'd be on Pinterest and posting my stuff. Right? Those are great opportunities to showcase your beautiful work.

Unknown:

Yeah, that's a great example for sure. So definitely clean up your boards. I know even if you want to use it personally, for business technically, like just hide the recipe boards is what I do also, so that I can still collect and use it. But make sure that whatever is forward facing is an extension of your brand. So do clean it up, make sure that whatever you're pinning is relevant as well. And just in case that it needs to be said, Just do not pin or post inappropriate content. I don't think that you also want to go on a pinning spree like crazy all day, every day, you don't need to be intentional. And it's going to just overwhelm your audience. If you are pinning a vast amount rather being consistent with quality content. At the end of the day, you know, you just mentioned consistency. And that's a great point to bring up. So for Instagram, I know that and for all social media platforms, consistency is key, especially when it comes to branding, right?

Joelly Goodson Lang:

I mean, we're talking about branding, you have to be consistent,

Christine Lieu:

I would say. So I think with anything, you want to make sure that you're putting out the best quality and value possible for your brand because it is a reflection of you. So if people see that as the first initial impression, and you have up to seven seconds or whatnot to make that first impression people are going to make a judgement whether you like it or not, it's the hard truth and reality checking away that you need to make sure that you're putting your best foot forward, I totally agree you'll only have one chance to make a first impression right? And right now people are scrolling super fast and you have to stop the scroll as they say what is it going to take to stop the scroll?

Joelly Goodson Lang:

This episode of branding matters is brought to you by gems for gems. gems for gems is a proactive charity focused on ending the cycle of domestic abuse. They do this by creating viable and sustainable path forward for survivors with a concentration on empowerment and economic recovery. gems for gems works hand in hand with the community to help survivors thrive. What can you do to help well if you have any use jewelry lying around that you no longer wear and let's be honest, we all have some of that you can donate it to their jewelry drive. If you have any spare time and you want to find a way to give back. This is a great opportunity and you can join their ambassador program. I personally am a part of this ambassador program because I'm all about empowering women and this is a great opportunity to do just that. And then finally, if you'd like to contribute financially, you can become a donor to their incredible Scholarship Program. Whichever way you decide to help just know that you are making a huge difference and your contribution is meaningful and greatly appreciated. To learn more about gems for gems, you can visit their website at gems for gems.com. You can also find them on Facebook, under gems for gems and on Instagram, under gems for gems Canada, and you can always reach out to me on any social media platform under brands. badass. And now back to our show. Let's talk logos. So when you're designing logos, because logo is a big part of a brand, obviously, what the process that you go through with your clients,

Unknown:

Yeah, your logo definitely needs to strike that balance between being easily recognizable, but also having that inclination of what you do right off the bat. But understand that these special subtleties that make you you are really unique to be able to incorporate into your logo and overall brand identity for that matter, as well. So think of your brand like a character in a story. For example, you want to know what the personality traits are, what they value, you should have an idea of who your audiences as well, and what your overall unique value proposition is to why they should choose you. So these intangible and strategic things we'll be able to incorporate into the actual visual communications itself. So you do want to incorporate these type of elements into your overall styling of your logo as well. So from there, you're able to actually take it a step further, and with that, overall look and feel with your styling and color choices, bring that vision to life. So by understanding that a little bit more, for example, I love incorporating different subtleties in logo design. So, for example, one of my clients, she has two children at home. And so with her logo, we actually incorporated a big a and a small age to represent them. So when you first look at it, this is just a little subtlety that you wouldn't maybe think twice about. But when you bring that storytelling element to it, and the little details in there, I think really help impact that connection that you bring to your clients or customers as well to be able to really have these visual elements that bring back your story and your identity in a visual way.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

I love that! My kids are a to Aiden and Aaron. So I totally get that. So when you're designing a logo, do you ever think about the different mediums and the different applications it's going to go on because I work with logos all the time. That's what I do, right? I use my clients logos, and I put them on hats and jackets and T shirts and pens, and you know, on and on and on, right? And I always look at a logo. And I'm like, why did they design it that way? Because some logos are so beautiful, but they're not good for being represented from broidery, for example, right and thin line or whatever. So do you ever think about the medium when you're designing a logo, or that doesn't come into play? I definitely appreciate what you do. Especially having gone through streetwear apparel and working with different manufacturers. That was definitely something that I had to consider for sure as well. And understanding that not only a digital presence is important now but you need to consider what is the physical output of it too, right? Or even like we talked about earlier to Julie about the one by one inch square that you see Oh, yeah. Now, right? Yep. So how does it actually scale is really important to consider like super, super small and tiny, like what is the minimum size that you can go. So when I create brand style guides, for example, for my clients, I make sure to include a logo uses and misuses section as well. So that they really understand how to actually go about considering applications for digital or physical, that's great, because there's so many logos out there that don't I have one client that I work with, and their logo isn't bad. But they have this tagline. And they need that tagline everywhere. And it's like it's, you know, showing and no one can see because this audio but in the tag lines, probably two inches and it's you can embroider it, you know, if you want to board it's gonna be six inches long. And it's every single time they want to do clothing. It's a struggle and other logos to where I've seen colors that are mashed together and then you try to take that logo and you want to reproduce it onto clothing and embroider I mean, look, we have come so far in the decorating world, right? I mean, when I first started 20 years ago, where you saw logo and user pad printed or embroidered or screen printed, now we have digital print. And we have sublimation we have so many ways, but so many logos that I see that I think if only they would start ahead the designer to think, okay, we're going to take this logo, and we want to put all the different mediums and we want to make sure it's going to reproduce well, like you said on all the different forms. So I love that you do that. Okay, let's talk about your podcasts. Cuz you know, I love podcasts now. So when did you start your podcast? And what was the impetus for you to start it and what's it. So it's called the Brand Party Podcast. So basically, if you love what Joelly's doing here, you'll probably love what I'm over there too. It's just fine, honest, actionable branding tips that you can implement right away in less than 30 minutes. And so the way that it started actually started with 30 days of Instagram lives, this was pre release, pre ticked off all of that and to challenge myself to show up with as much value as possible. So how many, so this was back in December of 2019. And so basically, with it lives anyways, it was like, basically, I would say six months prior to that launch date of the podcast. But essentially, from there, I told myself that whether I show it for two minutes or 20 minutes that I'm here to show it with value and that still remains true to this day with the podcast and so after the 30 days of live People really enjoyed it. So I did weekly Instagram lives from there on out. And it turned into five more months of that, surprisingly enough, and I decided one day to pull my audience if they would prefer to show up for an Instagram Live or if they would prefer a podcast and the people have spoken. Andhere we are. Did you know anything about podcasting before you started?

Unknown:

I have one friend actually, who started a podcast that I hadn't been on other people's podcast at that point as well. So and I was an avid podcast listener myself. So the world of it wasn't totally new to me, but starting one was very new, for sure at that time. And mind you when I started my podcast as well, I was going through like a health scare in my personal life, and then also closing up projects and running a challenge for my clients before Christmas holiday break, essentially, as well. So you can imagine how busy that time of year is. So I don't even know why. I decided that moment that I wanted to do it. But within less than two weeks as a one person army I just booked recorded, edited, designed, marketed everything myself for that whole beta of that first season.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

I hear Yeah, I'm, I've never known more. So what do you Okay, so you've been doing over a year, first of all, your health is okay, now?

Christine Lieu:

Yes. Thank you very much.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Okay, good. What do you love the most about podcasting? I'm just naturally curious. And I think we've talked about this too, before Julie that like, we just love connecting with your real ghost stories. Yeah, I love good badass stories,which is why I love your episodes. Thank you.

Unknown:

I love to be able to connect with people and hear their stories, because truly every buddy has something to offer. And it's just really giving them the opportunity to be able to amplify their voice from there.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

I agree. I love asking questions. It just it comes so naturally to me, and I love meeting people and I greet you. I think everybody has a story. And if you ask the right questions, you can bring those stories out of people, because a lot of times they'll see like, I have nothing to say, but everybody does. Right. So I'm totally on board with you. Yeah. So what do you find the most challenging about doing your podcast

Unknown:

As a visual creative person, I will be the first to raise my hand and say that writing show notes does not come naturally to me. So thankfully, I have brought on help into my third season now. And even into the second season, I acknowledged that the podcast is not the primary part of my business technically. So with the old designs, I do focus more on the branding, website design and social content for a client side of things. What's the biggest lesson you've learned in the last year about podcasting? I think similarly, with design as well is consistency.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Do you ever go back to your first episodes and listen and cringe and go, Oh, my God, I can't believe I said that.

Christine Lieu:

Alright, so it's definitely evolved since then. So I'm grateful for and humbled. But I'm glad with where it's at moving forward.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

For me the best thing about podcasting other than my guests, and other than learning, I've learned so much editing, editing is my friend because I listened back to episodes I edit myself, I actually had an editor at first, but I'm a bit of a type personality and with the version, and I thought, why am I paying someone when I'm redoing it? So I now edit them myself. And I go back, and I listened to them. And I hear myself say things and do and I cringe. And so I'm like, edit and I say to my friends, I'm like, if only we could edit real life, and you know, say something and then Okay, can I just edit that out?

Christine Lieu:

Right? Yeah, that's been a big lesson for sure, too, is honing in on your personal mannerisms of what you repeat just phonetically also where where your tics are and stuff like that. It's so interesting that you wouldn't normally be conscious of

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Yeah, I agree. Totally staying on the podcasting theme. So it's called the brand party podcast. So where did you come up with that name?

Unknown:

That was actually inspired by my branding challenge. I ran a five day branding challenge for clients before. And it's just, you know, sometimes branding can feel very daunting and overwhelming and overall frustrating for people. So if you feel any of those things, listening to this, you're not alone in that. But again, I just wanted it to be really fun, light hearted and know that you can still get an immense amount of value out of this type of content as well.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

I'm curious to know, what do you feel is daunting. So when you're working on branding with a client, what do they feel is daunting about the branding process?

Christine Lieu:

A few different things for sure. So that differentiation between who they are as a person versus who their business identity is, is a big feat for a lot of people as well as just having the overwhelm or daunting feeling of just where to start even because if it isn't natural for them to look at branding or marketing, for example, it's very overwhelming to have just a starting point as well. So sometimes you just need to reach out to somebody for support to have that guiding light for you, especially starting out.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

I totally agree if you're going to invest in your business and in your brand. I think you want to address in an expert who can help people with their brand and I do agree with you. I do think especially now in the world of COVID there are so many people that are forced entrepreneur And that was a big impetus for me because I felt there's so many people out there that actually don't have a clue what a brand even is or what it means and what the difference is. And so I'm bringing on experts like yourself to help educate people and help them learn. And you know, people who might not know that Pinterest is a good place for them to do some branding and marketing or even podcast is a great way as far as content marketing goes, and to get your audience learn more about who Christine is. That's why when you mentioned daunting, I was exactly the same. I think you're absolutely right. So brand party podcast. Christine, if someone wants to learn more about you, or CL design or your podcast, what's the best way for them to reach you?

Unknown:

If you want to have some fun and create your bold legacy? Definitely, you can find more information about me my work at Christine l designs comm or the brand party podcast wherever podcasts are found. And I'm always hanging out on Instagram as well. So come find me at underscore C. Liu, and at brain party podcasts.

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Well, I love it. Thank you so much for being on and joining me today is really pleasure. And I learned a lot and I'm going to go on Pinterest. So anyway, I might reach out to you for some pointers. And I hope to meet you in person next time. I'm in Toronto. Amazing.

Christine Lieu:

Thank you, Joelly

Joelly Goodson Lang:

Okay, talk soon. Bye. And there you have it. I really hope you enjoyed the conversation and maybe learned a few things to help you with your branding. But most of all, I really hope you had some fun. This show is a work in progress. So please make sure to rate and review on whatever platform you listen to. And if you want to learn more about the branding badass, that's me. You can find me on social media under you know it, branding badass. Thanks again. And until next time, here's to all you badasses out there