Branding Matters

Dr. Janét Aizenstros - Find Your Brand Voice

February 11, 2022 Branding Badass Episode 55
Branding Matters
Dr. Janét Aizenstros - Find Your Brand Voice
Show Notes Transcript

My guest today is Dr. Janét Aizenstros, the Chairwoman and CEO of Ahava Group Global (AGG) — a women-led modern media parent company that serves Fortune and multinational media companies in fifteen locations around the world.

In 2020, Janét scaled Ahava Group Global to nine-figures, making it the fastest-growing, women-led digital consultancy founded by a black woman.

Janét is an award-winning, internationally recognized leader and investor that focuses on women entrepreneurs creating social impact through technology. We don’t have enough room to list all her accolades, but here are a few just to give you an idea of her rock star status - Excellence Award for RBC Canadian Women Entrepreneur Awards 2021 by Women of Influence, 2019 Conscious Company Media’s Top 22 Business Leaders, 2013-2014 YMCA-YWCA Woman of Distinction of Business and Entrepreneur, recipient of the 2020 WXN Canada’s Most Powerful Women Entrepreneur Award: Top 100, and Employer Of The Year for Canadian Business.

I invited Janét to be a guest on my show to talk about the importance of brand voice. I wanted to learn how she helps big brands target their consumers, specifically black women. And I was curious to get her POV on what brands need to do differently to maintain true sustainability.

💥IF YOU WANT HELP GETTING YOUR CLIENTS TO FALL IN LOVE WITH YOUR BRAND,  REACH OUT TO ME ON SOCIAL AT BRANDING_BADASS OR EMAIL ME AT JGOODSON@GENUMARK.COM

Joelly Goodson :

Hi, I'm Joelly, your Branding Badass, and welcome to season two of Branding Matters. My guest today is Dr. Jant Aizenstros, the Chairwoman and CEO of Ahava Group - a woman-led modern media parent company that serves fortune and multinational media companies in 50 locations around the world. In 2020, Jant scaled Ahava Group Global to nine fingers, making it the fastest growing women-led digital consultancy founded by a black woman. Jant is an award -winning internationally recognized leader and investor that focuses on women entrepreneurs creating social impact through technology. I'm telling you, we do not have enough time to go through all her accolades. But here are a few just to give you an idea what a rockstar she is. The Excellence Award for RBC Canadian woman Entrepreneur Awards 2021 by Women of Influence 2019 conscious company media's top 22 business leaders 2013 2014 YMCA, YWCA, a woman of distinction of business and entrepreneur, recipient of the 2020 WX. And Canada's most powerful woman entrepreneur award, top 100 And Employer of the Year for Canadian business. Wow, did you get all that? I invited Jant to be a guest on my show to talk about the importance of brand voice. I wanted to learn how she helps big brands target their consumers, specifically black women. And I was curious to get her point of view on what brands must do differently to maintain true sustainability. Jant I am so honored to have you here today. Thank you for joining us, and welcome to Branding Matters.

Jant Aizenstros:

Thank you so much for having me. Thank you.

Joelly Goodson :

Oh, it's just it's my pleasure. This is just gonna be so fun. Let's get right into it because we have a lot to cover today. So Jant you're a black, Jewish woman who has broken every glass ceiling possible, and you're only 42 years old. So that just blows my mind and itself. You've accomplished more in your young life than most people twice your age. Can you share your origin story? Where were you born and what did you study in school?

Jant Aizenstros:

So I am originally from Guelph, Ontario, I am first generation Canadian. My mom is from St. Vinson, my dad is from Aruba. In school. When I first went to school back in early 20s, late teens, I did business management. And then after like kind of taking a bit of a detour, I was originally supposed to go to school for music, I was wanting to go to school for music, I wanted to be a singer. And that door shut quite quickly. And so he set me on a totally different trajectory that placing on the path of entrepreneurship. So it's just funny because even though I dabbled with entrepreneurship, I never really thought about becoming an entrepreneur.

Joelly Goodson :

So let's talk about Ahava. First of all, where's the name come from?

Jant Aizenstros:

Ahava is the Hebrew word for love. Since I love all things, media just made sense. So initially, when I have a digital started, it wasn't called to have a digital, but it was a full service creative agency. And we're working with influencers at the time and through multiple incarnations, we kind of ended up on the name a haba, which I think gives when to really what we do. It's a

Joelly Goodson :

Great name. So you said it's a Hebrew name. So are both your parents Hebrew?

Jant Aizenstros:

I will share this. My parents, my parents are not practicing Hebrews, but I have found out through doing genetic testing that both of my family on both sides have Jewish ancestry. That was very shocking, because I ended up marrying a Jewish man and I did not find out until the end of that marriage that I was in fact a Jewish so then after you're kidding, Oh, wow. So I was raised Christian. But then after I went, I found this out. I just I was like, Oh, I am in fact, Jewish. This totally makes sense. Now, I ended up with this in this relationship and all these things. Because my former husband, his family was ultra orthodox. And so we were already living that way. So it was just like, it was just solidifying, it was just solidifying who we were

Joelly Goodson :

What inspired you to go get tested.

Jant Aizenstros:

That's funny, especially what inspired me to go get tested. I actually came nothing from the Jewish side. It was just really being a displaced African, like many blacks that are outside of Africa are displaced. Okay. Just wanting to know, what's my origins? Yeah, really were where my roots from. And I think I was a bit shocked with that because I had been already living for almost 10 years within this. And I was like, Okay, this was not by coincidence. I know. This is gonna say calling me back. Hashem was calling me back into the break, because it was just really funny how that even came up. But it was, it was actually good in terms of because it was another piece to my story or another piece of the story that Hashem was curating for me.

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, absolutely. Well, that's a great story. I love that you shared that. Okay, so let's fast forward to more about your career and about your business and Ahava. So I've heard you say in interviews that "Your passion has to fuel your purpose", which I love. That's such a great quote. So can you elaborate a bit on that, and how that pertains to your passion and your purpose?

Jant Aizenstros:

Yeah, so my passion is women. I love women, I love women love being a woman, I love everything that comes with being a woman. And so I think for me, as well, as a company was growing, we were just becoming really focused on a lot of the advisors and boards. Oh, focus on bottom line. Bottom line? Obviously, that's an important part of business, no question. But it can't be the fueling force as to why you get up in the morning. And the parallel to that outside of I have a digital, I was doing a lot of things in the community with women and children. And just it's so warm to my heart. And I was like, Oh, my goodness, if I could find a way to kind of inter mingle or intertwine this, you know, this would be amazing. And so the company pivoted around 2015 2016, to where we started focusing more on data. And this came out of the some of the companies that we were working with, were asking for data and very targeted data. And that's kind of set me on a journey. And they sent me on a journey where I connected with another American female entrepreneur, who introduced me to an opportunity of acquire another company that kind of brought a have a digital Full Frontal full force into existence in the manner that people see it today. And so I'm forever grateful. But I do believe in the power of empowering women, supporting women in business. And I have found that that's my love for women has been my feeling force,essentially.

Joelly Goodson :

You know, you talk about empowering women. I've had a lot of conversations with women specifically. And empowerment and empowering women seems to be a common phrase that I hear a lot. And I'm curious what that means to you. What does empowerment mean to you? Because I've heard different definitions. So I'm curious to hear your take on what empowering a woman or empowering anybody? What does that mean to you?

Jant Aizenstros:

Uplifting them. A few years ago, I met this amazing woman named Michelle Branch, and she has an amazing story. She's Emmy award winning journalist. And she ended up adopting this little girl and the meaning of her her name in Hebrew means let her be greater. And the let her be greater just always gave me goosebumps. Every time that I said, every time that I even think about that concept. And I think that it's really important, just for everything that women have walked through throughout history, that we are finally at a time in history where just let her be greater, you know, we've been diminished, we've been placed in competition against each other, we've had all of these things that have happened to us, that has kind of even kept us apart. And now we're coming to a place of where we're unifying and holding hands and lifting each other. And I think that's so important. So let her be greater.

Joelly Goodson :

That's great.I love that. And you feel that also, you know, you're Jewish and black woman. So you've got two sort of minorities there, do you feel even more a sense of trying to create that empowerment?

Jant Aizenstros:

Absolutely. From the Jewish side, I just think the mindset dynamics are, are different, right? Jews very much operate in this communal sense of what I'll call a kibbutz mentality, right? Where it's like, we're gonna work together, regardless of how we feel about each other. I think that just from a lot of the trauma that blacks on the continent, as well as outside of Africa have experienced, it's kind of created a severing. But it's been beautiful to watch over the last few years is this unification that is happening amongst black men and women, and there's a healing of the ancestral story, that is bringing back the sense of community and focus on community. We see that definitely in the black Canadian community. You know, meanwhile, there's been some unfortunate circumstances that have kind of spilled over into other countries like Canada and the UK from the United States. I would share that it's also been propelling to see the momentum that many of black men and women are making collectively in terms of different sectors and sectors of business. So I'm excited and so I would share that I'm for it all. I'm for empowering and uplifting, all women, I've traveled to probably over 50 places globally, and there's no place like Canada, Canada, we have something really beautiful and really unique care and regardless of how People feel about current circumstances, or anything that may potentially be happening in our country, I tell them go into different parts of the world where your people don't even have basic freedoms, and dealing with treachery and, and murder and all of these things like you don't even you don't understand. I think a lot of times there's in I would say, first world countries when people act out is because they lacked the the nuance of other people's stories. You know, one shocking statistic that I even came across was over 60% of Canadians have passports, less than 40% of Americans don't have passports. So that just lets you know, in terms of mindset, what people's view, their viewpoints are, there's so much advantage to having diversity in Canada represents diversity and, and integration within that diversity. So it's really important that we preserve that and not get caught up in other narratives that are not necessarily our own.

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, I agree with you. And I love that you said about you traveling and seeing it because that was the same thing for me. When I was finished university, I actually went off and I traveled, I spent two years all through Southeast Asia and Australia. And that was a recurring theme when I would go to especially places like Indonesia and East Timor, where you see poverty and everything else. And I remember thinking like, wow, I'm pretty lucky to be in Canada, I think I think everyone should go traveling and go to other places. And that will make you appreciate it so much more.

Jant Aizenstros:

Absolutely.

Joelly Goodson :

Let's go back to business. Let's talk about marketing, and branding and advertising. And all the things that I think we're both extremely passionate about. This is one thing I want to talk about, which I found really interesting, and I've heard you talk about is there seems to be a lot of confusion between advertising, marketing and branding. And sometimes people aren't sure what the difference is. So I'd love to hear your perspective on what you think the differences are.

Jant Aizenstros:

When I think about branding. Branding is like the process of giving a meaning to a specific organization, company, products or services, right. So initially, what's happening there is that you're kind of creating and shaping this concept in the consumers mind, and how that translates into reality. It's making symbols and products pretty with this overarching message. But when you think about marketing, marketing is like the action, it's a set of institutions and processes of creating and communicating and delivery is exchange of offerings that have value for the customer, the clients, right, or even the society at large. And then will begin to advertising. Advertising is a meaning means of communication, the users of the product or service are, so I make sure I articulate this clearly, and that the messages are paid for. So it's really just, you're paying for this message of for who you're sending the message to, to how you inform and influence the people. So that's initially that I think where people get confused is probably more on the advertising side. So those are kind of like what I would think of definition wise. But if I was to break it down is like branding is where you make things pretty. And the story that you tell, marketing is the strategy component. And advertising is in fact, the visual, or the place of where you're actually having this user exchange. Okay, can you give an example of each I would share that marketing is in really confusing marketing is the strategy component, right? That is the place where you become you organize what your brand wants to, in fact, say strategy before even lends itself to the advertising piece. The branding piece is usually when I think about like, I can use examples for the brand, Apple, Nike, Coca Cola, Advil, Tylenol, these are examples of some brands that also have very powerful marketing and messaging. Branding is what people would call, it's making things aesthetically pretty to attract people into the conversation. But it's not just a static, it's also the story that's curated around the initial product or service. And it's connecting that right. So there's a sense of community, there's a sense of connection. And so that's the creation of the brand. So when we think about brand voice, it's the way that you communicate your initial brand, all of the beautifulness that you've created to your ideal client.

Joelly Goodson :

I love that you said that about brand voice. Can you elaborate a bit more on that? Because a lot of times you hear people not sure what that even means. So what does it mean to have a brand voice? And how do you develop one?

Unknown:

What a brand voice is, is that it's how the business or how the business has this distinct personality, and how it communicates that personality? Great brands tell great stories.

Joelly Goodson :

I love that repeat that. That's a great quote.

Jant Aizenstros:

Great brands tell great stories. And the other thing too, I think is important is because we're living in a world right now with digital saturation and everybody's online. You also you can have a great story. I also think a really important part of branding is how do you differentiate yourself, how do you stand out from all your competitors that are doing that? It's definitely done through your branding, I would probably say people have become intentional. And I don't think it's by chance like, especially with creating this competitive differentiation, right? Like, what makes your product unique? What's your unique selling proposition? Why should a customer buy from you, compared to your competitors product? Right? Like, you have to ask all of these types of questions. And then also we're looking at, you're looking at sustainability over time when developing a brand. So I think especially entering into the new wave of where we are now brands are looking at how they can create sustainability over time. So obviously, we've heard conversations around ESG and SDGs. These are becoming more important, especially for millennials and Gen Zers. They're not even interested in engaging a brand or a product that doesn't have some type of social focus around it.

Joelly Goodson :

Absolutely. For sure. I want to get into sustainability in the mid here, but I also want to talk you know, back to marketing for a second, I've heard you use the term aspirational marketing. And I thought that was interesting term. Can you share what aspirational marketing is and give an example of that.

Unknown:

So aspirational marketing is a term in consumer marketing. You know, it's funny, I was actually talking to someone about this recently. And there's so many examples. But one example that actually did jump out to me is a brand for man's a lot of people know about her man's as a brand. And it's interesting that permas has been able to hold its position without compromising their brand integrity. And what I mean by compromising because a lot of times when you look in the fashion industry, they'll create multiple tiers of branding to kind of pad their bottom line, right, because some of these products on these higher end products only create one or two offerings, right that they have at select locations globally, which isn't obviously enough to sustain a company over long term so they'll come up with different labels within that to make it more accessible to the masses. But even if I was to step out of something that's like in general consumer market, probably some of the most recent ones that also did some of the concepts that I talked about, about padding their bottom line was like Peloton and Tesla, right? So I'll actually talk about Peloton. I actually like Peloton story because peloton took an already existing product, okay? Think about how basic a treadmill and a bike is. They branded it beautifully. They they totally took it apart and they slapped it's pretty much a bike a treadmill, and they slapped an iPad on it and made it look pretty and multibillion dollar company. It's just a humorous and funny story to me, but uh, not humorous. As a slight it's just it was brilliant that it was they kept it simple, simple doesn't necessarily mean easy. But it was so simple that they were able to take these very basic products and slap price tags of $5,000 for treadmill for $2,000 Plus, for a bike where you know, somebody could go and actually get a bike or a treadmill at Walmart for like under $1,000 for each probably under $500 range, but they were able to make a multi billion dollar organization because they created this perception it was more of perception around people wanting to be a part of the community or a part of the tribe.

Joelly Goodson :

You know, I love that you said that I was gonna actually say that I think that is exactly what it is but their brand is that they created this community and have you ever tried one of the Peloton bike you've ever done one?

Jant Aizenstros:

I'm a Peloton, lover, okay?

Joelly Goodson :

My first experience on a peloton was I was in San Diego for the pandemics a few years ago and they have one in their gym at the hotel. And I was like, Oh, I used to try one. And so I get on it and it was a spin class and I do spin I actually said teach spin class A while ago. So here I was. Now I'm in a spin class on this Peloton and you're part of this community and the instructors talking and I guess there's people that you can leave comments so for me that was being part of that spin community on this bike I know what you're saying as far as the hardware goes where it's yes it's a bike and yes, it's an iPad but really transported into this world right and you're you're into this community and so that's that brand I think that is so strong and why it's done so well. I mean, Peloton has gone through a lot lately, too, because that

Unknown:

It wasn't a slight it was brilliant. Because you think about it. That's why I think that um, people have actually questioned me because I've heard this come up in conversations with me around repurposing. peloton actually is a perfect example of the era of repurposing, repurposing, taking already what existed and reinventing it in a totally unique way. What peloton did was they repurpose it recreated something that already existed in the market. Very simply, what they also inserted into it was a technology so one part that they did and this was already something that existed. They were not the first people to do the mobile application community concept. But what they did do is that they, they actually expanded on where other companies had failed. In terms of creating a sense of community. It wasn't just videos, they created a sense of community within that app where you could be friends or or track other people. People can give each other high fives. So it was almost creating a digital work a fitness experience, right within that application. I'm a Peloton are my my leaders together? We Peloton together. And it's funny, we're talking about spin class because there's one gentleman on there. I refused to do his class. Not because he's not good. But I said I'm not looking to murder myself.

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, that's funny. Yeah. Another example that comes to mind, as I hear you speaking is I don't know if a lot of people know this. But is Apple, right? I mean, Steve Jobs did not invent the mp3 player, right? He just perfected it. And they think the same thing with the iPad, like all he there, they were already out there. But they were not he took those and I think repurposed them and made them super simple and easy to use, and then created the strong brand.

Unknown:

What Steve Jobs did is that he focused on the user experience. And I will share this, many people, when they create a product, they understand what the product looks like in their head, and they get really excited about their products. And then they become almost to the point of combative when you're trying to tell them. It's not about what you want. It's about what the consumer wants, right? And you have to focus on what the consumer wants the beauty of what Steve Jobs did, his functionality is unprecedented, even to date, even if he were to use certain Android applications people have attempted to mimic they cannot even I would say even Samsung cannot even mimic what Apple has been able to do in terms of functionality.

Joelly Goodson :

Exactly. Well,did you read his book, by the way?

Jant Aizenstros:

Steve Jobs? Yeah,

Joelly Goodson :

Yeah, that was amazing book. Well, I think they talked about in the book about the intersection of technology and art, right. And he made technology. And he made it as simple even though it was not simple, you know, you referred to this earlier was technology is not simple, especially what he does. And he just wanted to make the experience as simple and easy as possible. You mentioned a bit earlier about sustainability. Why do brands need to maintain true sustainability to be successful?

Jant Aizenstros:

Well, one of the reasons is that even once a strong brand has established itself, you must continue to sustain and protect your brand equity. Right? And then there's also four fundamental components to that which something that I already mentioned competitive differentiation, in terms of your products like unique value, unique selling proposition, what is that? Why should your customer buy your product compared to your competitors? What are some of the basic or expected desired needs from your customer? And how can you in fact, serve your customer? Right? So you have to ask all of these things, and then also even about what differentiates your product in terms of cost, right? And also, can it be easily replicated by other people? So there's that component, then we're also looking at what we've talked about before brand consistency? And also the image? Is your brand focus to meeting is there consistent branding that makes your it clear to your customers, what they can expect from you, which really comes down to and I always tell this to people, please, please, please, especially for those that are starting businesses get clear on your vision? What do you want to achieve? What are your core values? How will your brand reflect this? Your value proposition people don't even understand the importance of your value prop? What value does your organization provide to customers that no one else can? What makes you stand out amongst the competition? And your positioning statement? How do you want to be perceived in the marketplace, right? So that way, you can ensure that you're matching your customer expectation with how your organization wants to be perceived. And so when people do this, it makes your marketing and sales and your customer service teams speak one consistent language and voice to your customer. And so the customer experience becomes much easier because it breeds trust and trust produces sales, and encourages loyalty and repeat customers. So those are some of the key things when I think about sustainability. But then there's two other very important steps as well legally protect your brand and its trademarks. So you don't want to see another company copying your idea. And, and actually, I'll use this as an example as well. If you ever had, at any time plan to sell your business, or undergo a merger of your company, you want to make sure that you're able to properly transfer the rights of those elements, right. And also ownership over those rights are also an essential in establishing brand consistency, credibility and reputation. And that's really How brands are able to sustain and have longevity? It's their ability to keep perpetuating this long term differentiation with strong brand recognition is what creates a sustainable brand.

Joelly Goodson :

I love all that. And I think those are all great. I do have a question for you when you were talking, as we talked about having nobody copy, but how do you prevent that because you see, that's how you see all over the place, especially on social medias brands copying each other, you see brands copy each other.

Jant Aizenstros:

A big part of that has to do in certain sectors, right? Like I'm talking, probably talking more business to businesses. So we need to clarify that, especially if you're looking at like something like influencers, or these startup EECOM websites, like you're seeing the duplication, and that's where I'm sharing with you, there's just a lot of companies that are jumping on the bandwagon trying to make money quick, and then they're going to be out and then on to the next thing. But if we're looking at the brands that have long term sustainability, the brands that have long term sustainability, achieved this through their competitive advantage, which is them having this unique ability with their attributes and company assets that keep make it difficult and actually use I have a digital as an example. So I have a digital doesn't have any competitors. And we don't have competitors, not because there are not other people on the market with our technology. There's no other person on the market with our data, methodology and process. And that's actually what definitely sets us apart from some of the major players in the data industry. We have verified data can find data from anybody, but it's difficult to find verified data and verified data. That's our probe, we developed a proprietary methodology, and how we verify consumer data and then refresh it.

Joelly Goodson :

I love that! Before we go, I want to talk about your podcast, I read that one of the greatest setbacks in your life was your divorce. And when I read it, as I read that, I'm like, Yeah, I can relate to that, same thing with me. And then you went on to say that what helped you get back on your feet was podcasting. Same here. So I was like, wow, this is interesting. And here's a direct quote that I read. And this really was what inspired me. You said "Through podcasting, I connected with many world renowned leaders who became mentors and friends who aided and supported me on my journey, I transformed because it was my choice to become better. I desired change for me and my children. I was relentless in my pursuit of joy and peace for my family. I already had a core foundation of discipline, consistency and focus." So when I read that, I swear to God, I'm really I'm like, I felt like so much of what you said I could relate to it was so inspirational. So tell me what inspired you to start your podcast?

Jant Aizenstros:

Well, it was called at bedtime, a woman's movement radio, actually, I ended it back in 2014, as have a digital was getting momentum, because I couldn't work with it. But I felt it was so influential in helping me heal and overcome so many things. I thought I would have been married forever, right? No, we are. I thought I was gonna marry forever. And then it ended. But the cool part in my story is that my former husband is still one of my very best friends. And so we co parent our kids together, I wish more people had what we had in terms of even if it doesn't work in relationship, the transition is still beautiful for your children or children are as happy as could possibly be. I never even saw ripple effects. So I started podcasting, podcasting became an outlet and a way for me to kind of have conversation and explore conversation. And it was interesting, because I was always drawing in spiritual people that had these really cool businesses. And then eventually, we partnered with Jim on to say, hey, house, I would say, hey, house, but there's another brella under their overarching brand that we worked with as well. But we started doing that. And then they started filtering a lot of their thought leaders into my world. And I've met some really amazing people. Some people can't went on to be friends. But I was discovering this. They were showing up at my door to heal me. I learned so much during that time. So it healed me It transformed me it renewed my mind. And it actually gave me it healed so much of my foundation actually gave me the fortitude to march forward and becoming the woman I am today.

Joelly Goodson :

I can relate so much. So what was it called? And what was it about? What was the premise?

Unknown:

So the premise was around, it was just having conversations with women. So okay. It's called women's movement radio. It's I don't believe it's online anymore. I believe I'm okay. Down. As the company started growing. We weren't doing any more and then it was also and I was also in a different place in my life, and I was very vulnerable. I was very vulnerable on those podcasts. And just for where I am now, I've discovered that like, vulnerability is a beautiful thing. But it's also when you're in a realm of business. You want to be vulnerable, but There has to be some boundaries with that vulnerability as well. And I'll share a cute little story with that I had an employee who said that they watched a video podcast of me they found a podcast with me online, for they applied for have been through like I've never seen a CEO be so vulnerable. And I went back and looked at the video and I absolutely loved that I loved that interview was so good. But it was also I also had to realize, you know, I to acclimate to my station, and keep some boundaries, like my employees don't need to know intricate details of what has happened to me. And that was a different time. And the podcasting was a different thing. But it was beautiful, because it empowered other women, it gave other women the opportunity to also share their stories as well.

Joelly Goodson :

So are you saying that you you don't think it's good to be so vulnerable or make boundries?

Jant Aizenstros:

Yeah, I think that you, you should be vulnerable, but leaders have boundaries. And you have to have boundaries, especially in leadership and how you share that information, because people will use your vulnerability as a weapon against you. It was a beautiful stepping stone. But I had a very unfortunate breach of privacy and betrayal. That all happened in 2018 with someone that I'm almost certain was not well, and I but I pray now that the person is well. But I think it just reaffirmed to me that it's really important to have boundaries, because a lot of times, there are some people that you meet that do genuinely have your best interest. I just think in the last years, and many people have talked about this, especially in success, I grew up in Guelph, and it was very, everybody loves your neighbor. But not everybody in the world is a love your neighbor type of person. And I think for me, kind of growing up in a bubble coming face to face with some harsh realities around human nature in the last 10 years has definitely left an imprint. But I'm still gonna wear my heart on my sleeve.

Joelly Goodson :

I think that's great advice. Because what I take away from that is you know, and you hear again, a buzzword is brands need to be more transparent and make me more vulnerable and everything else, which I agree with. But I also agree with you that there are people out there that will use your vulnerability against you. And so you have to do have those boundaries to make sure but it's not being fake, you know, you're not being fake, you're being who you are. But you're also making sure that you have boundaries to protect yourself, right. That's what it is, in a sense. So I appreciate you sharing that. Because yeah, you hear a lot about, you know, you've got to be vulnerable, you got to be vulnerable. It's really important. And I think it's it's important to know that so thank you for sharing that. And I love what you said to you know about when you had your podcasts about how all these people came into your life. And they all sort of taught you lessons and or help lift you up or empower you. And I could not feel that way more i but I've had my podcast now for just over a year. And each guest has taught me something you know, not only about branding and about business, but about myself. And it's helped me grow so much. And so I could totally relate to that quote when I read it, so So thank you for sharing it. And thank you for sharing your vulnerability. And this has been such a fun conversation. If people want to learn more about you. What is the best way for them to get a hold of you? Are you on social media?

Unknown:

Yeah, I'm on social media, they can find me on LinkedIn. And they can find me on JantAizenstros.com.

Joelly Goodson :

Okay, great. Well, thank you again Jant. Do you have any parting words before we go?

Jant Aizenstros:

I absolutely adored the conversation, having this conversation with you. Thank you so much for having me on the show.

Joelly Goodson :

Oh, it's been my pleasure. Well, I hope we will stay connected because you are a true pleasure. And I want to follow you and see all the wonderful things that you're going to do to help empower women. So we'll chat again soon. All right, bye. And there you have it. I hope you enjoyed the conversation and maybe learned a few things to help you with your branding. But most of all, I hope you had some fun. This show is a work in progress. So please remember to rate and review on whatever platform you listen to podcasts. And if you want to learn more about me and what I do to help my clients with their branding, feel free to reach out to me on any of the social channels under you guessed it, Branding_Badass. Branding Matters was produced, edited and hosted by Joelly Goodson, also me. So thanks again and until next time, here's to all you badasses out there.